Similarly Gallup polls show that Americans decreasingly perceive it to be

Similarly gallup polls show that americans

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concern for the country. Similarly, Gallup polls show that Americans decreasingly perceive it to be likely that a terrorist attack will take place in their country (Saad 2011). After the events of 9/11, no less than 85 % of those surveyed thought another terrorist attack against the United States was likely, a number that decreased to 52 % by 2002 and stood at 38 % in 2011. Second, along with a dwindling fear of terrorism since 9/11, data show that Americans express considerable concerns over counterterrorism measures and are less willing to accept such measure s in the name of the fight against terrorism. Since the events of September 11, Gallup polls show, US citizens increasingly less favor counterterrorism measures that might violate civil liberties (Gallup 2013). In January 2002 no less than 47 % of surveyed Americans stated that the government could take necessary steps against terrorism even if civil liberties were violated, but by 2011 only 25 % approved and no less than 71 % disapproved of such measures. Also, whereas in June of 2002 only 11 % of respondents felt that the administration had gone too far in restricting civil liberties, 41 % felt that this was the case as early as May 2006. Data from the Pew Research Center substantiate these findings by showing that increasingly fewer Americans feel that it is necessary to give up civil liberties to curb terrorism (Doherty 2013). In the immediate aftermath of 9/11, a majority of 55 % of those surveyed stated it was necessary to give up civil liberties in the name of counterterrorism, while 35 % expressed the opposite viewpoint. By 2011, the situation was reversed, with a majority of 54 % stating it would not be necessary to curb civil liberties and 40 % expressing the opposite opinion. Successful counterterrorism interventions by security agencies can be expected to influence attitudes . Recently noteworthy, for instance, is the sympathy many Americans showed towards law enforcement following the capture of the perpetrators of the Boston Marathon bombings in April 2013. Yet, such situational factors can easily be offset by other, more problematic interventions and more long-standing suspicions towards government power. Favorable sentiments created by the immediacy of the problems posed by a terrorist suspect being on the loose in Boston cannot be expected to carry over into a general embrace of a more permanent expansion of law enforcement powers because of long-standing American concerns over privacy. Indeed, Gallup data show that Americans have since 9/11 steadily affirmed their concerns over privacy and civil liberties (Gallup 2013). Findings show that from 2003 to 2011 some 65 to 71 % of respondents feel that government actions against terrorism should not violate Americans’ civil liberties. Such concerns over privacy are also found to be felt among large segments of the American public with respect to both government as well as private-business conduct, sentiments which strikingly unite respondents who identify as Republican, Democratic, or Independent (Doherty 2013). In 2012, respectively 72, 74,
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