Before Hitler comes to power in 1933 Jews in Germany were well integrated o

Before hitler comes to power in 1933 jews in germany

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· Before Hitler comes to power in 1933, Jews in Germany were well integrated o Could hold most positions, had high gov positions, and could enjoy positions in the academic world o Jews in Germany in the 20s were the envy of the Jewish world · So what happened in 1933? Did all Germans suddenly become anti-Semitic? · What did Germans know and to what extent were the Germans involved? · A lot of germans after the was said they didn’t know what was going on · Most scholars agree that the Nazis attempted to keep final solution a secret · Nazi regime was a result of militant fanatics that imposed their will on us and we had no power/say · Before the Nazis assumed power, 37% of German public voted for the Nazis · Big group of german puclic that supported National Socialist Program enough to vote for it · Scholars see emergence within the first year of a consensus in support of the regime and Hitler’s assent to power · In first few years, nazis succeeded in expanding their base of support: because of economic success and employment policy as well as foreign affairs · Population consented to violent attacks on Jews as long as non-Jews weren’t affected and as long as it did not hurt the country’s reputation abroad · In 1933 there was concern regarding boycott of Jewish stores · David Benkheir (scholar in Israel) found that anti-Semitic campaign that was being waged was going against German desires because people could relate to the victims Nazis were losing the public · Hitler wanted to establish a dictatorship but he also wanted to build consensus · Viktor Klemperer was a Jew in Germany who wrote diaries through the Nazi regime and he gives us a sense of the day to day · One of the thing he observes in May 1936 is that no one really wants to be rid of Hitler hoped it would be a regime that would destroy itself · For the most part, people were satisfied with the way things were going and very few people were concerned with losing the democratic aspects of Germany · Robert Jelachle has written on the response of German public and press: discovers there was an enormous amount of information published about the concentration camps · Studying the newspaper shows that people in Nazi Germany knew what was going on · In April 1941 there was a newspaper article that talked about the goal of Germany to be “Judenrein” (free of Jews) in the following year · People who were living newar a town called Mauthausen in Austrian could watch what was going on in the camp · Helmouth von Moltke executed for treason (because he talked about a world that did not include Hitler) · Berlin-Grunewald was the roundup point for Jews who were being deported Eastward · It becomes clear that there were many people who simply wanted to avoid facing the fate of Jews in the East and some people who did not give it too much thought
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· Knowledge of shooting of Jews in the east and gassings were widespread · Example of the women of the Rosenstrasse · In Berlin in 1943, there were visible roundups of about 11,000 Jews being sent to Auschwitz ·
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