ENGL 1321 Final Paper.docx

Stimulating kindness and suppressing hatred with some

Info icon This preview shows pages 4–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Stimulating Kindness and Suppressing Hatred With some basic knowledge on the neurology and psychology of hatred and kindness, there were a few potential answers to my question “Is there a way to generate kindness and decrease hatred in human beings?” The first solution to come to mind was a hormone supplement. Knowing that oxytocin is the “love hormone” released during acts of affection, would a supplemental increase encourage acts of kindness? The logic here is that an additional dose of oxytocin, known to be present in the brain during acts of affection, would increase the positive effects the hormone produces, thus encouraging more acts of kindness.
Image of page 4

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Leatherman 5 The other solution, which I found presented in The Nature of Hate , is cognitive therapy. In cognitive therapy, “[the client and therapist] try to uncover the meaning of the original stimulus to assess whether the client’s response is adequate or not” (Sternberg and Sternberg 211). In other words, the original “victim” of the hateful situation explains the situation to the therapist, and they work together to explain why the victim reacted as they did, if it was an appropriate reaction, and alternative motivations of the “perpetrator” that the “victim” may not have originally considered Counterarguments As in any argument, there are contrary opinions on the information and potential solution presented in this paper. As a brief introduction, the primary counterarguments to my proposed solution involve the side effects of oxytocin supplements and the funding and support of cognitive therapy. Oxytocin, despite being the “love hormone”, can make people hateful. In a study conducted by Carsten K.W. De Dreu, he analyzes evidence that shows oxytocin “motivates (i) in- group favoritism, (ii) cooperation towards in-group but not out-group members, and (iii) defense- motivated non-cooperation towards threatening outsiders.” In short, oxytocin will make you “love” those that are in your friend group, but be defensive and even hateful to those that are outside of this circle of people. This is known as the “tend-and-defend” function of the hormone (De Dreu). Also, it would be difficult to establish a network of funding and support for cognitive therapy. Monetary support would likely not come from the government, as we are already (i) not a mental health-supportive nation and (ii) several trillions of dollars in debt. The public may
Image of page 5
Leatherman 6 support this movement to a degree, but it is unlikely that they would request their representatives to support the funding of such a program, or be able to financially support it themselves. Reponses The counterarguments presented are completely valid. I acknowledge that this topic has only recently began to be studied, especially in the field of neurology. It’s not a loose plan that we can just rush in to. I am an advocate of further research on how supplemental oxytocin impacts human interactions, and a fully developed plan on the funding and necessity of a national cognitive therapy program. To address the concern of hateful impacts of oxytocin, I point to a study noted in the article by DeAngelis. Conducted by UIC researchers Angela Grippo, Stephen W. Porges, and Carter, they compared female prairies voles in their normal social environment for four weeks versus those that were forced to live in social isolation for four weeks. Those living in isolation had higher levels of cortisol and showed more signs of depression, anxiety, and cardiac stress.
Image of page 6

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern