Bloodless revolution 58 william and mary the husband

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Bloodless Revolution]58. William and Mary:The husband and wife couple who took over Enland after James II fled to France in 1688.59. Bill of Rights: 1689. No law could be suspended by the king, no taxes raised or armies maintained except by parliamentary consent, and no subject arrested and detained
without legal process. William III accepted these articles as conditions to receiving the crown and made relation between king and people like a contract.60. Act of Union, 1707:the act by which Scotland was united to England, or by which the two kingdoms were incorporated into one, in 170761. Act of Settlement, 1701:No Catholic could be king of England.62. Toleration Act:Allowed Protestant Dissenters to practice their religion but be excluded them from all political life and public service.63. Ulster Plantation: A massacre of newly settled Protestants in Ulster in 1641 and left bitter memories.64. Thomas Hobbes:1588-1679. English philosopher and political theorist best known for his book Leviathan (1651), in which he argues that the only way to secure civil society is through universal submission to the absolute authority of a sovereign.65. John Locke:1632-1704. English philosopher. In An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690) he set out the principles of empiricism, and his Two Treatises on Government (1690) influenced the Declaration of Independence66. Natural Law:that instinctive sense of justice and of right and wrong, which is native in mankind, as distinguished from specifically revealed divine law, and formulatedhuman law. A law or body of laws that derives from nature and is believed to be binding upon human actions apart from or in conjunction with laws established by human authority67. Cardinal Mazarin:Jules. 1602-1661. Italian-born French cardinal who exercised great political influence as the tutor and chief minister to Louis XIV.68. Fronde:A political party in France, during the minority of Louis XIV., who opposed the government, and made war upon the court party. The rebellion of the noblesagainst Louis XIV when he was a kid.69. Bishop Bossuet:70. divine right of kings:a name given to the patriarchal theory of government, especially to the doctrine that no misconduct and no dispossession can forfeit the right of a monarch or his heirs to the throne, and to the obedience of the people.71. Versailles:A city of north-central France west-southwest of Paris. It is best known for its magnificent palace, built by Louis XIV in the mid-17th century, where the treaty ending World War I was signed in 1919
72. Colbert:1619-1683. French politician who served as an adviser to Louis XIV. Colbert reformed taxes, centralized the administration, and improved roads and canals in an effort to encourage trade73. Five Great Farms:Free trade area set up by Colbert with a tariff union.74. Louis XIV:Known as “Louis the Great” and “the Sun King.” 1638-1715. King of France (1643-1715). His reign, the longest in French history, was characterized by a magnificent court and the expansion of French influence in Europe. Louis waged three major wars: the Dutch War (1672-1678), the War of the Grand Alliance (1688-1697), and

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