Add your resting heart rate back to this value for the target ceiling rate or

Add your resting heart rate back to this value for

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which you should exercise. Add your resting heart rate back to this value for the target ceiling rate , or your maximal level of intensity. EXAMPLE: 205 (maximal heart rate) -70 (resting heart rate) ----------- 135 (heart rate range) x .85 (maximal level of exercise or percentage of maximal heart rate) ----------- 114.75 +70 (resting heart rate) -----------
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184.75 (target ceiling rate or maximum heart rate at which you should workout)To summarize the above information, the threshold heart rate at which this 15 year old should workout is 137.5 bpm and the target ceiling rate is 184.75 bpm. Athletes and those already in good physical condition can (and do) workout at intensities higher than 85% of maximum heart rate, however, this is most effectively done with a coach or fitness trainer.Another way to calculate your recommended heart rate during exercise is using the percent of maximal heart rate method.This method is much simpler than the previous method, but it is less accurate given that a persons' fitness level (e.g., resting heart rate) isnot considered when using this formula.To calculate the lower endof the percent of maximal heart rate method, multiply your estimated maximal heart rate by .60, which represents 60% of your maximal heart rate. EXAMPLE:205 (estimated maximal heart rate for a 15 year old)x .60-------------123 = lower end of heart rate rangeTo calculate the upper limitof the percent of maximal heart rate method, multiply your estimated maximal heart rate by .90, which represents 90% of your maximal heart rate.EXAMPLE:205x .90-----------184.5 = upper end of heart rate rangeSo, using the percent of maximal heart rate method, a 15 year old student should get his or her heart rate up to at least 123 bpm, but not higher than 184.5 bpm.Recovery Heart RateImmediately after exercising, it is important to track your recovery heart rate. The higheryour level of fitness, the more quickly your heart rate will drop after exercise. For example, if you finish a mile run and your exercise heart rate is 160 bpm and 1 minute later, your heart rate is down to 100 bpm, you are very physically fit and your body is used to being physically challenged on a regular basis. If, on the other hand, you run a mile and your post-exercise heart rate of 160 bpm drops only to 140 after 1 minute, you have a lower level of fitness and regular training should improve the speed with which you recover from hard exercise.
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Heart Rate Assignment Name: Date:
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