Sherwood d 2003 churches as contexts for social work

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Sherwood, D. (2003). Churches as contexts for social work practice: connecting with the mission and identity of congregations. Social Work & Christianity. 30 (1), 1-13. Smidt, C. E. (2009). The social service activities of religious congregations in America. Review of Faith & International Affairs, 7 (3), 47-54. doi: 10.1080/15570274.2009.9523405 Tangenberg, K. (2004). Spirituality and faith-based social services: Exploring pro- vider values, beliefs and practices. Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought, 23 (3), 3-32. Tangenberg, K. (2005). Faith-based human services initiatives: Considerations for social work practice and theory. Social Work 50 (3), 197-206. van Loon, A. M. (2001). The challenges and opportunities of Faith Community Parish Nursing in an ageing society. Journal of Religious Gerontology, 12 (3/4), 167-180. doi: 10.1300/J078v12n03_13 Wang, P. S., Berglund, P. A., & Kessler, R. C. (2003). Patterns and correlates of contacting clergy for mental disorders in the United States. Health Services Research, 38 (2), 647–673. doi: 10.111/1475-6773.00138 Wiebe, M. (2010). Pushing the boundaries of the social work practicum: Rethink- ing sites and supervision toward radical practice. Journal of Progressive Human Services, 21 (1), 66–82. doi: 10.1080/10428231003782517 Xenakis, N., & Primack, S. (2013). The clinical aspects of case management and its role in graduate field education. Social Work Education, 32 (5), 685-691. Yancey, G., & Garland, D. (2014). Christian congregations as contexts for social work. Social Work & Christianity, 41 (4), 279-307. Fran Pearson, Department of Social Work, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC Kelly J. Poole, Department of Social Work, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC
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SOCIAL WORK & CHRISTIANITY 106 Wayne R. Moore, Department of Sociology and Social Work, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC Lelia Moore, Congregational Nurse Program, Cone Health Systems, Greensboro, NC John Rife, Department of Social Work, The University of North Caro- lina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC Antonia Reaves Richburg, Cone Health Foundation, Greensboro, NC Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Fran Pearson, Department of Social Work, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 174 Stone Building, Greensboro, NC 27402. Contact: [email protected] Keywords: congregational social work, mental health, health disparity, social work field education, interdisciplinary, nursing Appendix A CSWEI Pre-Service Curriculum 1) What is the Congregational Social Worker Educational Initiative [CSWEI] 2) What is the purpose of the Initiative and why is it so important a. ACCESS to CARE b. Description of project c. Areas of need and funder priorities 3) How has CSWEI grown? a. Partnership to Address Mental Health, Substance Abuse, and Co-Occur- ring Disorders in Vulnerable Populations b. Rockingham County Project c. HOPES 4) How is CSWEI related to the Congregational Nurse Program 5) How is CSWEI different/similar from other internships/field instruction experiences 6) What challenges and strengths/benefits would you anticipate encountering in this unique setting 7) How will success be defined [by] a. Students b. Consumers
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107 c. Funders d. Community and community partners e. Relationship, relationship, relationship f. CSWE Core Competencies 8) What do you need to know now a. Intern safety protocol b. Evidence-Based Practice [EBP] i. Principles of Recovery and Person First/Centered Language ii. Motivational Interviewing iii. Health literacy, “Ask Me 3” campaign iv. Patient navigators [community health worker] v.
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