Socrates set the agenda for the tradition of critical

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Socrates set the agenda for the tradition of Critical and Creative thinking, namely, to reflectively  question common beliefs and explanations, carefully distinguishing those beliefs that are reasonable and logical from those which--however appealing they may be to our native egocentrism, however  much they serve our vested interests, however comfortable or comforting they may be-lack  adequate evidence or rational foundation to warrant our belief. 1.4  SUBTOPIC 2 : Socratic Teaching/Questioning Method
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   a) Meaning of Socratic Questioning Socratic questioning   is mode of questioning that deeply probes the meaning, justification, or logical strength of a claim, position, or line of reasoning. Socratic questioning can be carried out in a variety  of ways and adapted to many levels of ability and understanding. Socratic Questioning is the oldest and still the most powerful teaching tactic/method for fostering  Critical thinking. It focuses on giving students questions, not answers; it models an inquiring, probing mind by continually probing into the subject with pertinent questions aimed at nurturing and  cultivating the mind into self-knowing. It’s to this background that Socrates considered himself  the  midwife of knowledge  contrary to what early sophists had conceived a teacher and d isp enser of  knowledge to be (a custodian that injects and indoctrinates others with what he/she knows or  considers to be or to constitute knowledge). The abilities we gain by focusing on the elements of  reasoning in a disciplined and self-assessing way, and the logical relationships that result from such  disciplined thought, prepare us for Socratic questioning/teaching method that characterise the  subject of critical and creative thinking. Thankfully, there is a predictable set of relationships that hold for all subjects and disciplines which  bear relevance to what Socrates intended. This is to be found in the general logic of reasoning.  In  Socratic approach, every subject is developed by those who had: shared goals and objectives (which defined the subject focus) shared questions and problems (whose solution they pursued) shared information and data (which they used as an empirical basis) shared modes of interpreting or judging that information shared specialized concepts and ideas (which they used to help them organize their data) shared key assumptions (that gave them a basis from which to collectively begin) a shared point of view (which enabled them to pursue common goals from a common  framework)
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