Similarly specifying the controls needed on a screen

This preview shows page 28 - 30 out of 36 pages.

Similarly, specifying the controls needed on a screen detracts from the true requirements of the system and often results in an inadequate level of discussion around why a system must support certain functionality. 2) When requirements are captured in screen mockups with no supporting requirements list, it becomes impossible to know whether an early screen design decision was made because it supports a necessary requirement or if it was made for some other reason. How can the analyst and developers know whether they can eliminate or alter the screen feature without losing an important requirement. Questions like, "Do we really need to have the control on this screen, or can we capture the data at a later point in the process?" becomes unanswerable without going back to the original stakeholders. And, on complex projects no one stakeholder may be able to answer the question. 3) Screen mockups alone cannot capture the flow through the system. Often analysts will accompany screen mockups with a written description of what happens when certain buttons are clicked or when certain values are entered within a field or dropdown. These descriptions are helpful, but they fall short of describing the end to end processes that the system must support. Further document such as process flows or use cases are required, but often overlooked when too much emphasis is place on screen mockups during the requirements gathering process. While analysts and stakeholders who are involved in the screen mockup process may have a basic understanding of the processes supported, developers and testers will not. Ultimately, the introduction of UI mockups can be very helpful, but this should only occur after an exhaustive list of features and usage scenarios (what business process flows need to be supported by the system) have been documented. Only then can the UI mockups be generated without introducing major pitfalls. 92. What is a Context Diagram and what are the benefits of creating one? The Context Diagram shows the system under consideration as a single high-level process and then shows the relationship that the system has with other external entities (systems, organizational groups, external data stores, etc.). Another name for a Context Diagram is a Context-Level Data-Flow Diagram or a Level-0 Data Flow Diagram. Since a Context Diagram is a specialized version of Data-Flow Diagram, understanding a bit about Data-Flow Diagrams can be helpful. A Data-Flow Diagram (DFD) is a graphical visualization of the movement of data through an information
Image of page 28

Subscribe to view the full document.

system. DFDs are one of the three essential components of the structured-systems analysis and design method (SSADM). A DFD is process centric and depicts 4 main components. Processes (circle) External Entities (rectangle) Data Stores (two horizontal, parallel lines or sometimes and ellipse) Data Flows (curved or straight line with arrowhead indicating flow direction) Each DFD may show a number of processes with data flowing into and out of each process. If there is a need to
Image of page 29
Image of page 30
  • Fall '19
  • Business analyst

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern

Ask Expert Tutors You can ask 0 bonus questions You can ask 0 questions (0 expire soon) You can ask 0 questions (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes