Range varies from 50 to 800 ft with speeds of 2 to 11

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Range varies from 50 to 800 ft with speeds of 2 to 11 Mbps Several versions of IEEE 802.11 standard defnes various forms of wireless LAN connections. Most wireless LANs include a wired LAN backbone Usually requires a wireless NIC
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Wireless Topology Two basic components necessary: * the client radio , usually a PC card with an integrated antenna installed in a laptop or workstation, and the access point (AP), which is an Ethernet port plus a transceiver ( لاابقتاس لااو لااسار لاا زااهاج ). * The AP acts as a bridge between the wired and wireless networks and can perform basic routing functions.
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Wireless Topology – diferent forms IEEE 802.11 – The original wireless standard, capable of transmitting data at 2 Mbps IEEE 802.11b – The second wireless standard, capable of transmitting data at 11 Mbps Newer IEEE 802.11 and 802.11b (Wi-Fi) standard defnes various forms of wireless LAN connections. Speeds up to 11 Mbps with 802.11b standard.
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Wireless Topology IEEE 802.11a – One of the more recent standards, capable of transmitting data at 54 Mbps (theoretical) using the 5 GHz frequency range. IEEE 802.11g – The other recent standard, also capable of transmitting data at 54 Mbps (theoretical) but using the same frequencies as 802.11b (2.4 GHz) and is backwards compatible with 802.11b.
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Wireless Topology HiperLAN/2 (European standard, 54 Mbps in 5 GHz band) To provide security, most systems use either Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP), which provides either 40- or 128-bit key protection, or a more advanced standard such as WPA ( Wi-Fi Protected Access ). Wireless LANs may also be confgured without an access point. These confgurations are called “ad-hoc”.
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Single-cell wireless LAN configuration
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Multiple-cell wireless LAN configuration
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Other Wireless Standards IEEE 802.11 (older 2 Mbps) IEEE 802.11b (11 Mbps, 2.4 GHz) Also called Wi-Fi (wireless fdelity) IEEE 802.11a (54 Mbps, 5 GHz, in 2002) IEEE 802.11g (54 Mbps, 2.4 GHz, in 2002) IEEE 802.11n (600 Mbps, 2.4 and 5 GHz, in 2009) HiperLAN/2 (European standard, 54 Mbps in 5 GHz band)
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Choosing a Topology Factors to consider include: According the available hardware resources: reliability, fexibility/expand-ability, and performance Bus/tree is most fexible Tree topology easy to lay out Ring provides high throughput, but reliability problems Star can be high speed for short distances, but has limited expand-ability
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Summary of topologies Logical vs physical topologies Bus and star-rings - old technologies Still some around You’ll probably use 1. Star-wired bus (star) With bus or routers (now much easier to use) 2. Wireless network (Wi-f)
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Types of Networks
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Local-area network (LAN) A network that connects a relatively small number of machines in a relatively close geographical area Network in small geographical Area (Room, Building or a Campus) is called LAN (Local Area Network) Small usually connects nodes in a single building.
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