Get fibers ropes nets twines aka soft technology to

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-get fibers, ropes, nets, twines aka soft technology to fish in the coastal zones before we get pottery. -a lot of ritual elaboration like chinchorrean mummies which are elaborate burials -all of these social complexities are ahceived without agriculture, pottery, WHEEL, AND ANIMLS LIKE 4000 B.C. LLAMAS ARE BEING USED TO CARRY THINGS OVER HILLS. -MAIZE is also used in south America and comes in 2200 b.c. but it doesn’t have such a great impact compared to llamas and local foods. -what are they eating? Anchovies, llamas, alpacas, potatoes, cotton, guinea pig. -2200 b.c.- just as maize is coming in, we have the development of three things in the Andean
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world: weaving for cotton, using animal fur like alpacas, metal making like gold silver metal, and large scale architecture like textiles for wearing and trading and social anchor and show political authority. -how and when do societies become complex? Societies that grow out of small scale into bigger ones. -what are the markers of architecture, leadership and trade in the coastal zones and highland zones. -what are the environmental basis in each of these areas and how do these affect population group? -long term built in societal anxiety when el nino does occur. -the big stone monument in el Parasio 2000 b.c.-as people enter the building, there are lots of doors and only special people know the access to it where the important stuff is kept. Made of hundred thousand stones and need pretty good engineering skills.
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