17 John P Roche The Founding Fathers A Reform Caucus in Action American

17 john p roche the founding fathers a reform caucus

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[17] John P. Roche, “The Founding Fathers: A Reform Caucus in Action,” American Political Science Review 55 (December 1961): 815; see also David Brian Robertson, “Madison’s Opponents and Constitutional Design,” American Political Science Review 99 (2005): 225 44 [18] Jackson Turner Main, The Antifederalists: Critics of the Constitution, 1781 1788 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1961), 249; Evelyn C. Fink and William H. Riker, “The Strategy of Ratification” in The Federalist Papers and the New Institutionalism , ed. Bernard Grofman and Donald Wittman (New York: Agathon Press, 1989), 220 55. [19] See Herbert Storing, What the Anti-Federalists Were For (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1988). [20] Pauline Maier, Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution, 1787 1788 (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2010). [21] Robert Allen Rutland, The Ordeal of the Constitution: The Antifederalists and the Ratification Struggle of 1787 1788 (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1966), 38. [22] William H. Riker, The Strategy of Rhetoric: Campaigning for the American Constitution (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1996), 26 28. [23] More specifically, see Robert A. Rutland, “The First Great Newspaper Debate: The Constitutional Crisis of 1787 –88,” Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society (1987): 43 58. These examples come from Robert Allen Rutland, The Ordeal of the Constitution: The Antifederalists and the Ratification Struggle of 1787 1788 (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1966), 73 74, 135 38, 265 66; and John P. Kaminski and Gaspare J. Saladino, eds., Commentaries on the Constitution, Public and Private (Madison, WI: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1981), vol. 1, xxxii xxxix. [24] On the most commonly reprinted articles, see William H. Riker, The Strategy of Rhetoric: Campaigning for the American Constitution (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1996), chap. 6, esp. table 6.1. [25] John P. Kaminski and Gaspare J. Saladino, eds., Commentaries on the Constitution, Public and Private (Madison, WI: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1981), vol. 1, 243. 2.3 Constitutional Principles and Provisions LEARNING OBJECTIVES
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Saylor URL: Saylor.org 69 After reading this section, you should be able to answer the following questions: 1. What is the separation of powers? 2. What are checks and balances? 3. What is bicameralism? 4. What are the Articles of the Constitution? 5. What is the Bill of Rights? The Principles Underlying the Constitution While the Constitution established a national government that did not rely on the support of the states, it limited the federal government’s powers by listing (“enumerating”) them. This practice of federalism (as we explain in detail in ) means that some policy areas are exclusive to the federal government, some are exclusive to the states, and others are shared between the two levels.
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