Maybe everybodys mas and misses werent as good as

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They didn’t even have to think about clothes or nothing like that. . . . Maybe everybody’s Master and Misses weren’t as good as Master George and Miss Betsy, but they was the same as a mammy and pappy to us n- ---s.”Tempie Herndon Durham Narrative 6. How much trust do you give this narrative? 7. Who did Tempie marry? 8. It was very rare for slaves to marry. Why do you think the masters did not allow their slaves tomarry? 9. How often was Tempie allowed to see her husband? 10. Tempie had 9 children. Why do you think Tempie’s master was okay with her having so many kids? 11. What happened to Tempie and her husband after the Civil War? 12. Of course Tempie does not wish to return to being enslaved but why does Tempie miss the old days of slavery? 13. Think of two daily/routine things that former enslaved people would struggle with AFTER slavery ended Buying medicine and learning to cook Document C This interview was with Perry Lewis in Baltimore, Maryland. The interview was conducted in
1937 by a black interviewer identified as Rogers in the final transcripts. I was born on Kent Island about 86 years ago. . . . My father was a freeman and my mother a slave, owned by Thomas Tolson, who owned a small farm on which I was born in a log cabin. . . . As you know the mother was the owner of the children that she brought into the world. Mother being a slave made me a slave. She cooked and worked on the farm, ate whatever was in the farmhouse and did her share of work to keep and maintain the Tolsons. They being poor, not have a large place or a number of slaves to increase their wealth, made them little above the free colored people and with no knowledge, they could not teach me or any one else to read. . . . I have heard that patrollers were on Kent Island and the colored people would go out in the country on the roads, create disturbance to attract the patrollers’ attention. They would tie ropes and grape vines across the roads, so when the patrollers would come to the scene of the disturbance on horseback at full tilt, they would be caught, throwing those who would come in contact with the rope or vine off the horse, sometimes badly injuring the riders. This would create hatred between the slaves, the free people, the patrollers and other white people who were concerned. . . . I do not remember being sick but I have heard mother say, when she or her children were sick, the white doctor who attended the Tolsons treated us and the only herbs I can recall were life- everlasting boneset and woodditney, from each of which a tea could be made.

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