Notify the king island community of the installation

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Notify the King Island community of the installation of structures and the reasons why they have been erected; Develop a King Island Code of Ethics for the recreational use of beaches addressing threats to shorebird habitat and breeding sites; Develop and implement a community education program for the management of threatened shorebirds on the island. King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 175
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Sternula nereis nereis (Fairy Tern) Description Sternula nereis nereis is a small tern which can be difficult to distinguish from the very similar little tern Sternula albifrons sinensis . In the breeding season, adult Sternula nereis nereis have a black crown, pale grey upperparts, and a white forehead, throat, chest and belly (Plate 15). The bill is orange-yellow and the legs are dull yellow. In non-breeding plumage the crown is largely a mottled black and white and the bill becomes blackish at the base and tip. Immature fairy terns are similar to non-breeding adults, and young birds are similar to immatures, but the upper-wing coverts and mantle are mottled grey and brown. The Fairy Tern can be distinguished from the Little Tern as the latter has a triangular white patch on the forehead when breeding. The Little Tern is also slightly smaller, with dark outer primaries, rather than grey outer primaries in the Fairy Tern. Sternula nereis nereis feeds almost entirely on fish. Foraging birds fly several metres above the sea surface, hovering on rapidly beating wings with bill pointing downwards, then dive with wings held in a steep V before plunging into the water, rising again after a few seconds. Current Status Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 : Vulnerable Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 : vulnerable Plate 15. Sternula nereis nereis (Photograph: DPIPWE) Figure 14. Sternula nereis nereis: King Island distribution King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 176
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Existing Conservation Measures The Lavinia State Reserve Draft Management Plan (Parks & Wildlife Service 2004) recommends restriction of vehicular access to April–September (inclusive) for the area of Nine Mile Beach between Lavinia Point south to the mouth of the Sea Elephant River in order to protect shorebird habitat. Temporary fencing to protect nesting habitat was trialled in 2009 at south Yellow Rock beach, though a larger fenced area may be required to protect chicks as they leave the nest sites (Woehler 2009). Distribution and Habitat The range of Sternula nereis nereis extends from the Dampier Archipelago, Western Australia, southward to Victoria and Tasmania including its offshore islands. Sternula nereis nereis is also found in New Zealand and New Caledonia. Sternula nereis nereis is found on coastal beaches, inshore and offshore islands, sheltered inlets, sewage farms, harbours, estuaries and lagoons. It occurs in both fresh and saline wetlands, including lakes and salt-ponds. Sternula nereis nereis nests in small colonies on elevated exposed sandy beaches.
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