2 Founding edit There are a number of different folk stories about the founding

2 founding edit there are a number of different folk

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[2] Founding [ edit ] There are a number of different folk stories about the founding of the Kingdom of Dahomey. Most scholars believe many of these stories were created or exaggerated in the 18th century to promote the legitimacy of the Dahomey royal regimes at the time and thus may be based only loosely on actual events. [3] The most common founding myth traces the establishment of the kingdom to the royal lineage of Allada . According to this story, there was a Fon prince named Agassu in the city of Tado who tried to become king but lost the struggle and took over the city of Allada instead. Around 1600, two (in some versions three) princes in Agassu's lineage fought over who would be the ruler of Allada. [1] It was decided that both princes would leave the town and found new kingdoms with Teagbanlin going south and founding the city that would become Porto-Novo and Do-Aklin moving to the Abomey
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plateau to the north (Porto-Novo and the Kingdom of Dahomey remained rivals for much of history). [3] Do-Aklin's son Dakodonu was granted permission to settle in the area by the Gedevi chiefs in Abomey . However, when Dakodonu requested additional land from a prominent chief named Dan the relationship grew hostile. The chief responded to Dakodonu, with sarcasm, "Should I open up my belly and build you a house in it?" Dakodonu killed Dan on the spot and ordered that his new palace be built on the site and derived the kingdom's name from the incident (this may be a false etymology [4] ): Dan=chief, xo=Belly, me=Inside of. [3] Rise and expansion (1600-1740) [ edit ] Kingdom of Dahomey Timeline c. 1600 AD According to oral tradition, Dakodonou establishes palace in Abomey. 1724- 1727 AD Agaja conquers Allada and Whydah . 1730 AD Dahomey loses war with the Oyo Empire becoming a tributary. 1823 AD King Ghezo defeats Oyo in war and ends tributary status of Dahomey. 1851- 1852 AD British put naval blockade on Dahomey ports stopping the slave trade. 1892- 1894 AD Second Franco-Dahomean War leads to colonization of Kingdom of Dahomey. 1900 AD French exile Agoli-agbo formally ending the Kingdom of Dahomey. Further information: Agaja The empire was established in about 1600 by the Fon people who had recently settled in the area (or were possibly a result of intermarriage between the Aja people and the Gedevi). The Palace in Abomey was established in the early 17th century. The foundational king of the Kingdom of Dahomey is often considered Houegbadja (c.1645-1685) who built the Royal Palaces of Abomey and began raiding and taking over towns outside of the Abomey plateau. [1] [4] At the same time, the slave trade began increasing in size in the coastal region through the Kingdom of Whydah and Allada and trade with the Portuguese, Dutch, and British. The Dahomey Kingdom became known to European traders at this time as a major source of slaves in the slave trade at Allada and Whydah. [5] King Agaja , grandson of Houegbadja, came to the throne in 1718 and began significant expansion of the Kingdom of Dahomey. By 1720, King Agaja repudiated the kingdom's allegiance to Allada and began increasing military activity throughout the region. In 1724, Agaja offered his military to help
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with a succession struggle within Allada.
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  • Spring '19
  • Jane White

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