The person centered approach has developed into a more pluralistic approach

The person centered approach has developed into a

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The person-centered approach has developed into a more pluralistic approach, what Quinn (2015) calls PCT-plus. Using a variety of methods to aid in the therapeutic process, the counselor has been more directive to achieve certain outcomes with the client (Kirschenbaum, 2012). Yet, this may lead to ineffective counseling as the therapist is motivated to be the agent of change instead of motivated by the core conditions. There is no longer unconditional acceptance, so change may not occur. The theory hypothesized by Rogers was that the client understood himself and could be his own agent for change with the trust of the counselor. Using different techniques may imply that the counselor has lost trust in the client’s ability to know himself (Quinn, 2015).
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9 Laura Rice and Eugene Gendlin, both followers of Rogers, aided in the emergence of the PCT-plus movement—branches of person-centered therapy. Rice aided in mentoring the founder of emotion-focused therapy, and Gendlin developed focused- oriented (Quinn, 2015). “Pluralistic” person-centered therapist assumed that no one technique will work for all and that the facilitating conditions are not necessary and sufficient (Cooper & McLeod, 2010; & Quinn, 2015). The method of pluralistic person-centered therapy placed priority on the client’s needs and the therapist’s ability to respond to those needs with appropriate technique which may vary every meeting (Cooper & McLeod, 2010). Together the client and therapist created a plan or agenda that is suited best for the client (Cooper & McLeod, 2010; & Quinn 2015). Unlike the classical Rogerian approach, pluralistic PCA began therapy with the client’s goals as a starting point to better understand the motivation of the client’s will to change. Classical Rogerian therapists would have felt that agendas or beginning with the goal in mind was too focus- oriented and too mechanical (Cooper & McLeod, 2010). Perceptions of Person-Centered Therapy Basic tenets of the Rogerian approach have been considered essential for therapists in understanding the motivations for humans to change. Rogers’s hypothesis on the core conditions for person-centered therapy, while considered unproven, has become widely accepted in the field of mental health. While there is still argument over the facilitating conditions being “necessary and sufficient” for change, many have accepted the core conditions of empathy, congruence, and unconditional positive regard as paramount to the therapeutic process (Quinn, 2015). While the person-centered approach has many strengths such as the bond created by the client and therapist, the approach also has weaknesses (Johnson, 2011). One problem has been addressed was: “Core conditions are easier to understand than to practice” (Johnson, 2011, p.
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10 266). Humans have an inclination to judge and perhaps feel negatively about a client. The classical Rogerian approach asked therapists to be open toward the client; however, practicing sharing an opinion on the client’s life was not the approach Roger meant (Farber, 2007).
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