The establishment of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission April 1 2007 The

The establishment of a truth and reconciliation

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The establishment of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission April 1, 2007: The launch of the Advocacy and public information program. March 2007: The Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement received approval from nine courts across Canada. This launched a five-month opt-out period in which former students could choose to reject the IRSSA. May 10, 2006: The Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement was approved by all parties the Agreement. It is the largest class action settlement in Canadian history. May 30, 2005: The Government of Canada appointed the Honourable Frank Iacobucci to work with legal counsel for former students, legal counsel for churches and other representatives of former students, including the Assembly of First Nations and other Aboriginal organizations, to conclude an agreement that would address not only cases of abuse but also the broader harms arising from the Indian Residential School experience. The government launched an Advance payment program for eligible former Indian Residential School students who were 65 years of age or older. November 2003: The Government of Canada launches the National Resolution Framework, which includes a litigation strategy, health supports, a Commemoration program, and an Alternative Dispute Resolution process.
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June 2001: Indian Residential Schools Resolution Canada was created as a separate department with the mandate to address the legacy of Indian Residential Schools and to manage and resolve claims. 1998: The Government of Canada announced Gathering Strength, Canada's Aboriginal Action Plan. The Plan included the establishment of the Aboriginal Healing Foundation and a Statement of Reconciliation. 1996: The Final Report of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples was released. It recommends a public investigation into the violence and abuses at residential schools and brings the experiences of former students to national attention. 1876: The Indian Act is enacted. It contains a number of clauses that allow the federal government to establish Indian Residential Schools. What happened to the children who attended Indian Residential Schools? Did every child have the same experience? Not every child had the same experience because there were different residential schools and they treated the children different. The also treated the children different from age and gender. They would also treat a child different on how well they cooperate with the nuns. What do survivors have to say about their own IRS experience? Where were Indian Residential Schools set up in Canada? Residential schools were set up in every Canadian province and territory except for New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. What were the locations of the schools? Far away. Like so far it was in the middle of nowhere. They were 100’s of kilometers away from civilization How many were set up in each province and territory? 33 in Alberta, 29 in BC, 19 in Manitoba, 5 in Newfoundland, 8 in the NWT, 1 in Nova Scotia, 2 in Nunavut, 21 in Ontario, 11 in Quebec, 22 in Saskatchewan, and 6 in the Yukon Were they located close to the children’s homes?
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