You can see from this cycle that I built up the weights progressively over the

You can see from this cycle that i built up the

This preview shows page 132 - 137 out of 285 pages.

You can see from this cycle that I built up the weights progressively over the 10 week period, as is the case with all well-thought-through training cycles. However, what may confuse you is the relatively light weights I used—given that the end result was a deadlift of 1,003lbs. The reason for this is that I have a quite frankly freaky ability to train light and lift heavy when it counts (at the competition). You will need to train at a higher percentage of your 1RM (as shown in all the examples of cycling in this chapter).
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126 You will see that I started the cycle with 5s and then reduced the reps to 3s as the weeks went on and the weights got heavier. This is a sound approach for intermediates and advanced lifters. Feel free to experiment with this if you fall into one of those two categories.
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127 How to squat 1,214lbs Here is the exact training cycle that I used in the build up to my 1,214lb squat. You will again see that the poundages look quite light in relation to the final weight lifted. However, this is what worked for me and you must find what works for you, while adhering to the basic principles of cycling… 12 weeks out from the competition: 507lbs x 5 (belt and loose knee wraps) 11 weeks out: 540lbs x 5 (belt and loose knee wraps) 10 weeks out: 572lbs x 5 (belt and loose knee wraps) 9 weeks out: 616lbs x 5 (belt and loose knee wraps) 8 weeks out: 661lbs x 5 (belt and loose knee wraps) 7 weeks out: 726lbs x 3 (belt, loose knee wraps and single ply briefs) 6 weeks out: 800lbs x 3 (belt, loose knee wraps and single ply briefs) 5 weeks out: 860lbs x 3 (belt, loose knee wraps and single ply briefs) 4 weeks out: 925lbs x 2 (belt, loose knee wraps and single ply briefs) 3 weeks out: 990lbs x 2 (belt, loose knee wraps, 2-ply briefs and half suit) 2 weeks out: 550lbs x 3 (belt, loose knee wraps) 1 week out: rest and then put full multi-ply equipment on and squat 1,214lbs at the competition.
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128 You will see that this looks like most well-thought-through power cycles. It starts out with modest weights and builds up to heavier poundages over the course of several weeks. You will see that 2 weeks out from the competition I dropped the weight down to 550lbs for a triple. This was to start the de-load process. You only need to be concerned with such things if you plan on com- peting and unless you are elite, a one week de-load is probably enough (not the 2 week de-load you see in my squat cycle).
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129 Cycling—the wrap up In this chapter you have discovered a highly effective and very simple way to program your strength training—cycling. Here are the key points once again… • You can use linear, wave, or step cycles for your strength training. If in doubt, use the simplest approach that gets you results. • Make your cycles 4 to 12 weeks long. • Start out with moderate weights and build up to a PR. • Increase the weights from week to week (or session to session) by 5 to 50 pounds. Only the big boys will work with anywhere near 50 pound jumps. For mere mortals, 5 to 20 pounds jumps usually work best. Novices and beginners should stay in the realms of 5 to 10 pound jumps.
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  • Fall '19
  • powerlifting, Bench press, Andy Bolton

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