a considered judgment about the wisdom or significance of past decisions and

A considered judgment about the wisdom or

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a considered judgment about the wisdom or significance of past decisionsand events.Distinguishing statements of fact, inference, and judgment may at first seem difficult to do. Thatis because often they are woven closely together. It takes a special and conscious effort todistinguish between these three types of communication. But the effort will be rewarded becauseit will make reading history (or any subject) more interesting to you. And it will help developyour critical thinking abilities by enabling you to distinguish information from opinions.Practice this skill on the following excerpt from the textbook. For each of the numberedstatements in the excerpt, circle F for fact, I for inference, or J for judgment on the answer gridthat follows the excerpt.
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77(1) Seeing no future in the Carolinas and unwilling to vegetate at Wilmington,(2) Cornwallis marched north into Virginia, where he joined forces with troops underBenedict Arnold. . . .(3) General Clinton ordered Cornwallis to establish a base at Yorktown, where hecould be supplied by sea. . . . (4) It was a terrible mistake. (5) The British navy inAmerican waters far outnumbered American and French vessels, but . . . (6) the French hada fleet in the West Indies under Admiral François de Grasse and another squadron atNewport, Rhode Island, where a French army was stationed. (7) In the summer of 1781,Washington, de Grasse, and the Comte de Rochambeau, commander of French land forces,designed and carried out with an efficiency unparalleled in eighteenth-century warfare acomplex plan to bottle up Cornwallis.(8) The British navy in the West Indies and at New York might have forestalled thisscheme had it moved promptly and in force. (9) But Admiral Sir George Rodney sent onlypart of his Indies fleet. (10) As a result, (11) De Grasse, after a battle with a British fleet. . . won control of the Chesapeake and cut Cornwallis off from the sea.(12) The next move was up to Washington, and this was his finest hour as acommander. (13) He desperately wanted to attack the British base at New York, but at theurging of Rochambeau he agreed instead to strike at Yorktown. . . . (14) He soon hadnearly 17,000 French and American veterans in position.(15) Cornwallis was helpless. (16) He held out until October 17 and then asked forterms [of surrender]. . . .1. F I J5. F I J9. F I J13. F I J2. F I J6. F I J10. F I J14. F I J3. F I J7. F I J11. F I J15. F I J4. F I J8. F I J12. F I J16. F I J
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