Eventually they will develop declining behavior and

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Eventually they will develop declining behavior and understanding skills, unable to recognize anyone’s face and forgot how to use simple tools they’ve been using their whole life. Early-onset familial Alzheimer’s Disease is a disease characterized by early on set dementia along with a family medical history positive for dementia. The symptoms are identical to Alzheimer’s Disease, but the act of twitching is more prevalent in EOFAD
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patients. The main differentiating factor is that symptoms begin to surface at a much earlier age. By definition, the dementia symptoms could arise any time before the age of 65 to be considered early-onset, but symptoms can begin as early as in their twenty’s, which is very rare, but more commonly in someone’s 30’s, 40’s or 50’s. The diseases also differ by the way they affect the brain. Early-onset causes more changes in the brain and concentrated more towards chromosome 14. Alzheimer’s disease is extremely detrimental to the brain, as many neurons stop and lose all function, then die. The disease itself stops or disrupts vital processes within the brain, including communication, metabolism and repair. In the early stages of Alzheimer’s, the neurons and their connections will be destroyed in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. This is what directly causes the memory loss. At a later point, the cerebral cortex will slowly deteriorate causing the language and reasoning difficulty as well as odd social behavior. Eventually the neuron damage spreads to the entire brain which causes death. This deterioration actually causes the brain to shrink in size. 3. Genetic counselor assesses an individuals or familys risk of inheriting conditions, such as genetic disorders and birth defects. They provide data and guidance to other healthcare providers, or to people and families that have a concern about an inherited condition. For
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  • Spring '18
  • Kevin Lee
  • Genetics, Genetic disorder

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