hours of the dates at which they had chosen and when the buildings were at

Hours of the dates at which they had chosen and when

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hours of the dates at which they had chosen, and when the buildings were at their fullest with victims. Both men were “home grown terrorist” who had a distaste for the federal government. Both men had a history of violence, anger issues, and problems with anyone who was in law enforcement. Their ideals that the government was to blame for major events that had unfolded in their respected times, seem to be the driving force of their attacks. McVeigh hated the federal government and placing blame on them for the Ruby Ridge and Waco, TX sieges. He felt that thegovernment was attacking people on the basis of their 2ndAmendment rights. Mateen placed blame on the government for the death of the ISIL leader who was killed in a bombing in Iraq, aswell as the bombings in Syria. Their motives are the same and the anger and hate for the
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TERROR ATTACKS 7government being the motives for their attacks. Neither McVeigh nor Mateen cared about the impacts or effects that their actions would have on those who would survive. The major impacts that were left behind are the lives lost. The monetary damage is bad, but the loss of life is greater in comparison. McVeigh killed 168 people injuring 500, while Mateen killed 49 and injured 50. The impacts are both emotional and mental for all those who managed to escape the rubble or thebullets. Many families lost fathers, mothers, brothers, sisters, and friends, but worse of all parentslost their children, and the impacts were not just local but even felt on a national level. Days following the Oklahoma City Bombing, the streets in front of the White House were closed and the security in all federal buildings was at an all time high. People across the country mourned the loss of so many lives, including the 19 children who were in daycare when the bomb went off. Federal buildings use to allow daycares within the building, but after the bombing even that was changed, but the biggest and most unnoticed impact was the way that the FBI worked. The mental and emotional impact that was left on the survivors is surreal. People including fire/ems personal, federal agents, and surviving children, all suffer from either emotional or mental trauma, along with PTSD [Pfe02]. The same way that the impacts for the Oklahoma City Bombing could be felt nationwide, the same can be said about the impacts of the Pulse NightclubShooting. The major impact that became very aware nationwide was the outcry for harsher gun laws and importance of mental health. Once again, the country found itself mourning the loss of so many lives that were taken away for no other reason then hate. The LGBT community felt the impacts the hardest overall. The survivors no longer felt safe in their own respected community, and most refused to leave their home, and would become scared and traumatized from loud banging noises. The biggest impact was a rise in the abuse of alcohol and drugs by the survivors to help cope with the trauma. Once again, the government found themselves as the blame for the
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TERROR ATTACKS 8terror attack that took place. Many people blamed the FBI for not arresting Omar when he was
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