There are positive and negative associations with actions that are intended and

There are positive and negative associations with

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There are positive and negative associations with actions that are intended and what actually comes of it. Many individuals who experience something traumatic in which they did not intend for misfortune to happen often result in poor consequences. An example of this, would be someone who takes the night out with friends drinking and is designated to the be the driver of the group. A designated driver on a night of drinking implies that the driver will be sober enough to safely transport whoever they took in their car home safely. As the night progresses, the designated driver proceeds to share a few drinks before heading home. Once the driver notices an 2
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Hoang argument fueling between the people he took in his car, he realizes that is time to take everyone home before it gets out of hand. As he is about to take the last exit before dropping them off at home, someone drives passed them causing the car to swerve and flip out of control. As a result, the backseat passenger ejected out of the car and died on impact due to not wearing a seatbelt. The intention of the designated driver was not to hurt anyone in the car, but the consequences of getting behind the wheel while even buzzed ended in a negative consequence. But also, there are those who have cruel intentions with the intended result of negative consequences. In another example, someone may have cruel intentions of killing someone by poisoning their food by adding it into the mixture, but the concoction was actually an antidote and ended up saving their lives rather than the intention of a negative consequence. Kant created a set of moral laws that is universal and will carry through years of time, similarly modeling after laws found in mathematics and physics. He created these set of laws to help distinguish what are and are not moral actions. The first is that morality is necessary and universal. Second, if an action is moral then it must be universally accepted and pertinent to all humans. Third and fourth, personal specific wants or desires are not necessary or universal so these cannot be actions. Fifth, actions that are not based upon specific wants or desires are deemed moral actions. An example of these laws would be when a professor set a specific deadline for an assignment worth about twenty percent of your grade, but students still asked to submit the assignment late past the deadline. The professor can make a decision to either accept this late submission because of a desire to be a good person to help a student receive a better overall grade in the class or abide by the rules that they set for the rest of the class and not accept the submission so they are not unfair to everyone who submitted their assignments on time. A desire that makes your feel good must be based upon something that is not necessary and 3
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Hoang potentially not universally accepted. In accordance to Kant, an action based on desire is dependent on two different reasons: people desire different things and an individual may not share the same desires over time.
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