to take it regardless of whether theyre going to eventually move into an

To take it regardless of whether theyre going to

This preview shows page 16 - 18 out of 108 pages.

to take it, regardless of whether they’re going to eventually move into an incident handling role. In my opinion it is the most critical, foundational class that SANS offers.” - Kevin Wilcox , Information Security Specialist
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DAY 1: Incident Handling Step-by-Step and Computer Crime Investigation The first part of this section looks at the invaluable Incident Handling Step-by-Step Model, which was created through a consensus process involving experienced incident handlers from corporations, government agencies, and educational institutes, and has been proven effective in hundreds of organizations. This section is designed to provide students a complete introduction to the incident handling process, using the six steps (preparation, identification, containment, eradication, recovery, and lessons learned) necessary to prepare for and deal with a computer incident. The second part of this section examines from-the-trenches case studies to understand what does and does not work in identifying computer attackers. This section provides valuable information on the steps a systems administrator can take to improve the chances of catching and prosecuting attackers. Topics: Preparation; Identification; Containment; Eradication; Recovery; Special Actions for Responding to Different Types of Incidents; Incident Record-Keeping; Incident Follow-Up DAY 4: Computer and Network Hacker Exploits – Part 3 This course day starts out by covering one of attackers’ favorite techniques for compromising systems: worms. We will analyze worm developments over the last two years and project these trends into the future to get a feel for the coming Super Worms we will face. Then the course turns to another vital area often exploited by attackers: web applications. Because most organizations’ homegrown web applications do not get the security scrutiny of commercial software, attackers exploit these targets using SQL injection, cross-site scripting, session cloning, and a variety of other mechanisms discussed in detail. Topics: Password Cracking; Web Application Attacks; Denial of Service Attacks; Hands-on Exercises with a List of Tools DAY 3: Computer and Network Hacker Exploits – Part 2 Computer attackers are ripping our networks and systems apart in novel ways while constantly improving their techniques. This course day covers the third phase of many hacker attacks – gaining access. Attackers employ a variety of strategies to take over systems from the network level up to the application level. This section covers the attacks in depth, from the details of buffer overflow and format string attack techniques to the latest in session hijacking of supposedly secure protocols. Topics: Network-Level Attacks; Gathering and Parsing Packets; Operating System and Application-Level Attacks; Netcat: The Attacker’s Best Friend; Hands-on Exercises with a List of Tools DAY 2: Computer and Network Hacker Exploits – Part 1 Seemingly innocuous data leaking from your network could provide the clue needed by an attacker to blow your systems wide open. This day-long course covers the
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