100000 made it to land and secured French villages along the coast D Day the

100000 made it to land and secured french villages

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100,000 made it to land and secured French villages along the coast (D-Day, the Battle of Normandy). All totaled, it is estimated that on June 6 th , 425,000 Allied and German troops died, were wounded or went missing as well as 200,000 German soldiers who were captured “D-Day, the Battle of Normandy”. As the assault continued, 326,000 troops, 55,000 vehicles, and 105,000 tons of supplies had also landed on the beaches by June 30 (D-Day, the Battle of Normandy). By August 1944, the success of the D Day invasion was evident with the liberation of Paris by the Allies and the Germans being removed from France (D-Day, the Battle of Normandy). The Battle of Normandy was considered over “D-Day”. The Germans now had to fight the war in the east against the Soviets and the west against the Allies as well as in Italy with the continued bombings by the Allied forces against Germany (The National WWII Museum). It would take another year for the war in Europe to be over. D-Day is still remembered and revered today. Celebrations are held each year. Many soldiers return to Omaha Beach and the cemetary at Normandy around the 6 th of June each year as well as at other times. It is taught in school to children in elementary school as well as junior high and high school United States history courses. There is a large memorial at Omaha Beach and Normandy, near Paris, France, as well as a cemetery. Some of the places that the Allies used 3
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Waters to fight are still present. There are also several museums dedicated to World War II and D-Day. A memorial to World War II and another to the Holocaust victims is located in Washington DC. Another relatively new museum, The National World War II Museum, is located in New Orleans, Louisiana. It was inspired by General Eisenhower. This museum has four buildings, one is dedicated strictly to the planes, tanks, and uniforms. Another building was designated to the different battlefields. Instead of pushing an elevator button to change floors, the push of a button changed battle fields that someone could enter, and saw the different ways of living depending on the location of the soldiers.
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  • Spring '16
  • Megan Stone
  • History, D-Day, World War II, Normandy Landings, Invasion of Normandy, National WWII Museum

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