Reference brand p j nd athens sparta democracy vs

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Reference: Brand, P. J. (n.d.). Athens & Sparta: Democracy vs. Dictatorship. 262 words Permalink | Show parent | Reply Re: Athens and Sparta by Stephen Muthumbi - Monday, 11 February 2019, 4:53 AM Hi Christina, I found your response well written and easy to understand. From your post, we see the Spartan way of life as quite disruptive to the family unit. From the infanticide , the Agoge at age 7yrs, absentee fathers, and the insane courtship and marriage. I wonder what e²ect this may have produced in latter generations. We see them having problems with dwindling populations, probably more as result of the lower birth rates as mortality in war. 77 words Permalink | Show parent | Reply Re: Athens and Sparta by Erin Morris (Instructor) - Tuesday, 12 February 2019, 9:15 AM Hi Christina and Stephen, In the reading it notes that in Sparta, infants with birth defects or abnormalities were "exposed" - left out to die. is interesting to think about infanticide in Sparta and other ancient cultures. In our culture, abortion is controversial - even if the unborn fetus is known to have developmental problems or genetic problems before being born. Infanticide is illegal in the world we live in, and our society has several services in place to diminish the practice of infanticide or child abuse. But I don't think that we can assume Spartans were heartless warriors who exposed babies not "physically ±t". First, infanticide was practiced in several other
4/1/2019 HIST 1421 - AY2019-T3: Athens and Sparta 20/51 ancient societies. Second, there are some very good reasons for an ancient culture to expose weak or sickly babies. Here are four: 1) Mothers who are nursing a baby have a far lower chance of becoming pregnant. Therefore, if a mother didn't waste time nursing a child that was sickly and may die anyway, she could get pregnant and have another strong, healthy child. 2) Ancient cultures were without any sort of accommodations for the handicapped. There was no social security, wheelchairs, resource programs, long term hospitals, etc. A handicapped child would be a drag on the town, and parents would have to care for that child full time (which was much more di´cult than it would be today). Few people would have the resources to successfully do that in the ancient world. 3) In Spartan religion, the idea of a "soul" of an unborn or newborn baby wasn't the same as our idea of a soul today. A person was just a person. Often, a sickly child was viewed as a sign of a god's displeasure or anger. 4) Many healthy children died before reaching adulthood. Chances are good that the baby would die shortly after birth anyway. So as you see, infanticide was actually quite practical and common in ancient cultures. Maybe you could even consider all it compassionate, to some extent.

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