Hofstedes Cultural Comparison for China and Hong Kong Hofstedes cultural

Hofstedes cultural comparison for china and hong kong

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role in the transformation of their region into an economic hub for the world. Hofstede’s Cultural Comparison for China and Hong Kong Hofstede's cultural dimension is a framework that provides a lens through which cultural differences between various nations can be identified and understood, provide a way to do business in these cultures or countries (C.F.I). He developed his constructs based on a detailed study and analysis of the various elements that define cultures around the world. From these elements, he summarized or grouped them into six main dimensions; uncertainty avoidance, power distance, masculinity and finally, individualism (Hofstede). The other two are long-term orientation and indulgence. Understanding how these six dimensions work can help explain the differences between the cultures in Hong Kong and China, and further provide a better
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Surname 3 explanation of how business and management can be done in the two countries. The above chart was obtained from - comparison/china,hong-kong/ and helps illustrate the cultural differences between the two nations. Hong Kong and China rank more or less the same in uncertainty avoidance, while Hong Kong ranks higher in individualism. It is among the highest even in the larger Asian continent. Such can be down to the fact that perhaps the influence of British rule, who have quite a high index on individualism, impacted them(Taylor). The individualism index in Hong Kong illustrates a society that values collectivism rather than singularity. The same can also be the case for China, which ranks slightly lower in the same category. In a collectivist culture, loyalism is
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Surname 4 the main ingredient (Hofstede). Every member of the group usually takes responsibility for anything that befalls the group. China ranks higher in all the other dimensions. Hong Kong and China seem to be great risk-takers as can be seen from their very low uncertainty avoidance indices. One characteristic of an entrepreneur is that he or she should be a risk-taker. The higher the risk-taking ability, the better it is for business (Hofstede). The two cultures have a clear disposition to trying things out, which constitutes risking things. This, therefore, implies that they are a good destination for businesses, especially startups.
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  • Summer '18
  • Brett Gordon
  • Economy of the People's Republic of China

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