Ethical behavior is everyones responsibility not just

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Successful Project Management
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Chapter 11 / Exercise 39
Successful Project Management
Clements/Gido
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Ethical behavior is everyone’s responsibility, not just the project manager’s. Every member of the project team must be accountable for his or her actions. Personal integrity is the foundation for workplace ethics. Individuals who have a mindset of trying to “get away (from being caught) with things” will erode that foundation. Other members of the project team need to put peer pressure on such individuals to help modify the behavior by communicating that they do not agree with, condone, accept, or want to be party to such behavior. A point to keep in mind when guiding ethical behavior on projects is to not do anything that you would not want your family, friends, neighbors, or coworkers to read about or see in the news or on a social networking site. 11-6 Conflict on Projects Conflict on projects is inevitable. You might think that conflict is bad and should be avoided. Differences of opinion are natural, however, and must be expected. It would be a mistake to try to
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Successful Project Management
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Chapter 11 / Exercise 39
Successful Project Management
Clements/Gido
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suppress conflict, as it can be beneficial. It provides an opportunity to gain new information, consider alternatives, develop better solutions to problems, enhance team building, and learn. As part of the team-building process, the project manager and project team need to openly acknowledge that disagreement is bound to occur during the performance of the project and reach a consensus on how it should be handled. Such a discussion needs to take place at the beginning of the project, not when the first situation occurs or after there has been an emotional outburst. It should be addressed at the project kickoff meeting. The following sections discuss the sources of conflict on a project and approaches to handling these conflicts. 11-6a Sources of Conflict During a project, conflict can emerge from a variety of situations. It can involve members of the project team, the project manager, the customer, and other stakeholders. Here are eight sources of potential conflict on projects. Work Scope Conflict can arise from differences of opinion about how much work should be done, how the work should be done, or at what level of quality the work should be done. Take the following cases: In a project to develop an order-tracking system, one team member thinks that bar coding technology should be used, whereas another individual thinks that keypad data entry stations should be used. This is a conflict over the technical approach to the job. In a community festival project, one team member thinks that mailing an advertisement about the festival to each household in the town is sufficient, whereas another thinks that the mailing should be sent to all residents in the county, advertisements should be placed in newspapers, and a website established. This is a conflict over how much work should be included.

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