a c b d e f 321 Offensive Play Calling in Key Game Situations Before calling a

A c b d e f 321 offensive play calling in key game

This preview shows page 328 - 331 out of 376 pages.

a c b d e f
Image of page 328
321 Offensive Play Calling in Key Game Situations Before calling a play against any defense, the offensive coach must know and identify the strengths and weakness of the opponent. The opponent may use different fronts, coverages, and blitzes, but they still have a basic defense that they play most of time. Different teams, however, may play a given system in different ways, depending on personnel and philosophy. One team may play cover 3 and have an aggressive run-support free safety. Another team may have a free safety who plays cover 3 deep and conserva- tively. Other considerations you have to look for include the following: What blitz packages does the defense use? Do they zone blitz? How aggressively does the front play? Do the linebackers attack or read? How big are the cornerbacks? Do they flip-flop? • Does the secondary support the run, or do they play in strong pass- coverage mode? After looking over this information, a coach should bring out the plays that have been successful against those types of defenses in the past—runs, counters, play-action passes, drop-back passes, or sprint-out passes. You may need to adjust your key plays to take advantage of defensive weaknesses. For example, do you want to attack their free safety with a post or a drag route? You also need to consider what plays and formations appear to cause problems for your opponent’s alignment or matchups. The key to creating the offensive edge is to keep the defense off balance by calling and executing plays at the right time. Key Situations A useful idea we have borrowed from the business world is the 20-80 rule, which states that 20 percent of what you do produces 80 percent of the results. Therefore, for maximum efficiency, learn what the 20 percent is and spend 80 percent of your time there. In coaching football, the secret is to define key game situations (that 20 percent) and put a high percentage of your time there. In six key situations, play calling can make a difference in the outcome of the game: third down, at the goal line, after a turnover, the final two minutes of the half or the game, when the game is on the line, and over- time. Third Down Third down, considered by most coaches the most important down in foot- ball, is a key situation. You need to prepare for and practice third-down plays. We break down third-down plays by yardage and plays. Play calling
Image of page 329
322 Westering should focus on plays that enable you to get specific yardage. We look at plays that in theory should get us anywhere from 2 to 4 yards to 12 to 15 yards or more. Another consideration you must keep in front of you is how you will deal with pressure. Some typical options are to keep in extra blockers (tight ends or running backs), to move the pocket by rolling the quarterback out, or to spread out the defense with four or five receivers.
Image of page 330
Image of page 331

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture