Figure 2 9 managing talent supply imbalances managing

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Figure 2-9: Managing Talent Supply ImbalancesManaging a Talent Surplus1.Reduce employee work hours or compensation2.Attrition3.Hiring freezes4.Voluntary separation programs5.Workforce downsizing/reduction in force (RIF)Managing a Talent Shortage1.Increase employee work hours through overtime2.Outsource to a third party3.Implement alternative work arrangements4.Use contingent workers (temporaries, independent contracts)5.Reduce employee turnoverFigure 2-12: Key HR MetricsHR Staff and ExpensesHR-to-employee ratioTotal HR staffHR expenses per FTECompensationAnnual wage and salary increasesPayroll as a percentage of operating expensesBenefit costs as a percentage of payrollRetention and Quality Average tenure of employeesPercentage of new hires retained for 90 daysPerformance quality of employees in first yearStaffing
Number of positions filledTime to fillCost per hireAnnual turnover rateTrainingHours of training per employeeTotal costs for trainingPercentage of employees participating in tuition reimbursement programDevelopmentPositions filled internallyPercentage of employees with career plan Ex: Cost per hire is what kind of HR metric?Ex: Of this metric, what category does it follow?Chapter 3 – Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO)Protected characteristics:Individual attributes that are protected under EEO lawsand regulations 1.Age2.Color3.Disability4.Genetic information and marital status (some states)5.Military status or experience6.National origin7.Pregnancy8.Race and religion9.Sexual orientationWhat is/isn’t an illegal job ad?“Exclusive” or “only” is wrong“Preferred” is allowedEx: Only people of the LBTG community first - this is in their favor, so it’s okSources of Regulation & EnforcementEnforcement by: Courts, EEOC, Department of Labor, and the NLRBStatus-blind: Employment decisions that are made without regard to individuals’personal characteristicsTheories of Unlawful DiscriminationDisparate Treatment:individuals with particular characteristics that are not jobrelated are treated differently from othersIs overt and intentional
Follows a pattern or practiceJudges different people by different standardsUses same standard, but it is not related to the individuals’ jobsEasy to proveDisparate Impact:when an employment practice that does not appear discriminatory adversely affects individuals with a particular characteristicIndividuals of a protected category are substantially underrepresented as a result of employment decisions that work to their disadvantageSubtle on the surface but discriminatory in actionEx: showing a drivers license to vote; fireman test Ex: Griggs vs. Duke Power (1971) decision: mandatory high school diploma, on the surface it sounds okay but in reality not many AA’s had one Figure 3-2: EEO ConceptsNondiscriminatory Decisions

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Term
Spring
Professor
JosephMGoodman
Tags
Management, Discrimination, Organizational studies and human resource management, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

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