See ip addresses are divided into classes with each

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See, IP addresses are divided into classes with each class having a different default IP subnet mask. If you see an IP address without a mask, and if the default mask is being used, you can determine the subnet mask by identifying the address class and using the default mask value. IP Address Classes 4:27-7:24 There are five IP address classes. A, B, C, D, and E. The IP addresses that fall into each class are identified by looking at the first octet in an IP address. The remaining octets can be ignored when identifying the address class. A Class A address in the first octet has a value between one and 126. The default subnet mask associated with Class A is 255.0.0.0 an example Class A address would be something like 10.0.0.1 this part of the address is the network and this part is the host. Class B addresses are between 128 and 191 with the default subnet mask of 255.255.0.0, the first two octets are the network address and the last two are the host address. An example of a Class B address is 172.76.3.1. Class C addresses start at 192 and go up to 223 and it's default subnet mask is 255.255.255.0. So, if we see an IP address of 192.168.3.5 we immediately know it's a Class C address with a subnet maskof 255.255.255.0. This part of the address is the network and this part is the host. IP address classes can also be used to identify the total number of different networks, and the total number of different hosts that are possible. Remember, hosts need to have a unique address. In addition, networks also need to have unique network addresses. By looking at each class, we can see that, for example, a Class A address can have a lot of different hosts on a single network because this portion of the address is dedicated to the host addresses.However, only the first octet is dedicated to the network address portion. So, only 128 different networks are possible. The opposite is true for Class C addresses. Class C supports a lot of different network addresses but only 254 hosts per network. Now, you may be thinking, wait, you should be able to have 255 hostsbut this actually isn't the case. Every network has two reserved addresses that cannot be assigned to hosts. These are the network addresses which is a zero and the broadcast address which is 255. This means with a Class C network, only one through 254 can be assigned to hosts. The last two address classes are used for special addresses and don't have a default subnet mask. Class D addresses are between 224 and 239, and Class E is 240 to 255. Class D addresses are called multicast addresses. A multicast address identifies multiple computers, rather than a single host. Class E addresses are experimental. Summary 7:25-8:03 So, those are the basics of TCP/IP network addressing. Remember, IP addresses consist of four binary octets that are written in decimal notation. IP uses subnet masks to identify the network portion and the host portion of an address. And there are five different IP address classes that can be used to determine default subnet masks. A Class A addresses has the first octet full in the subnet mask. A Class B address has the first and second
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