Distinctiveness people want to show that they are

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Distinctiveness: People want to show that they are different from other groups. Status: People want to identify with groups of high status. People may wish to associate themselves with high-status groups, for example, by being a member of an exclusive country club. Uncertainty reduction: People want to better understand who they are and their role in the world. By joining a group, people can use the group’s identity to help them understand who they are. For example, employees in a highly innovative firm may consider themselves to be highly innovative individuals. The firm helps such individuals understand who they are. You should now read Robbins and Judge (2015), Chapter 9, pp. 275-277 to learn more about groups. 1.3 Five-Stage Group Development Model Groups typically go through a similar sequence as they evolve. Do note that not all groups will follow this model, but it is a useful framework to understand how groups evolve. Groups go through the stages of forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning. These stages are defined below: Forming: Characterised by a great deal of uncertainty about the group ’s purpose, structure, and leadership. Members try to determine what types of behaviour are acceptable. Storming: Characterised by intra-group conflict. Members accept the existence of the group, but there is resistance to constraints on individuality. There is also conflict over who will control the group.
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BUS103 STUDY UNIT 4 SU4 4 Norming: Characterised by close relationships and cohesiveness. The group structure solidifies and the group has a common set of expectations for what defines correct member behaviour. Performing: The group structure at this point is fully functional and accepted. Group is focused on performing the task at hand. For permanent work groups, performing is the last stage in their development. Adjourning: For temporary groups, there is an adjourning stage where the group prepares for its disbandment. Attention is directed towards wrapping up activities. Think about the groups that you have been in. Did you experience these five stages? Is there a particular stage that you enjoy more than the rest? Why so? You should now read Robbins and Judge (2015), Chapter 9, pp. 278-279 to learn more about the different stages of group development. Also, take a look at Exhibit 9-1 of your text for a diagram of these five stages. You should now watch Study Unit 4, Sections 1, 2, 3, & 4. 1. Group Behaviour - Unit Overview 2. Groups & Types of Groups 3. Why People Join Groups 4. Tuckman’s Group Development Model (Access video via BlackBoard)
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BUS103 STUDY UNIT 4 SU4 5 Chapter 2: Group Outcomes 2.1 Group Properties Think of the groups that you are a part of at work. What do you think influences the behaviours of group members? In this section, we will learn about group properties, factors that shape members’ behaviours and group performance. We will cover roles, norms, and diversity.
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