Ontario-Template-rdims-12497439-v1-standardized_uav_sfoc_application_-_onatrio_region-002.doc

More and more people are using unmanned aircraft for

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will assist in the facilitation of the safe movement of aircraft in Canada. More and more people are using unmanned aircraft for work or pleasure. Transport Canada regulates their use to keep the public and our airspace safe. NAV CANADA manages operations and executes the day-to-day operational control and management of flight operations. Aircraft without a pilot on board go by many names—unmanned air vehicle (UAV), remotely piloted aircraft system, model aircraft, remote control aircraft, and drone. In Canada, we currently use the term “Unmanned Air Vehicle” for all groups, except model hobbyists. UAV users are responsible to fly their aircraft safely and legally. In Canada, users must: • Follow the rules set out in the Canadian Aviation Regulations (see link in Appendix D). • Respect the Criminal Code as well as all municipal, provincial, and territorial laws related to trespassing and privacy. • Be responsible partners and users within the Air Navigation System, coordinating operations with NAV CANADA as appropriate. For operations within Tower control zones (in Class C and D): Towers are Air Traffic Control units that deliver positive control to maintain a safe, orderly, and expeditious flow of air traffic. This means that all aviation users require prior authorization to enter and operate in a Tower’s area of responsibility . Normally this area is a 5NM ring around the facility, and altitude from the surface to 3000’ AGL. That said, the dimensions vary significantly throughout the region and the appropriate aviation publications (CFS, VNC, VTA) must be consulted to confirm dimensions. For UAV operations within the control zone, all operations will be coordnated in advance with the applicable ATC/ATS unit. All altitudes shall be specifically authorized by the appropriate ATC/ATS unit, and included in the SFOC application. NavCanada will at all times have the right to refuse UAV operations within their areas of operation if they do not feel the operator will be able to operate safely . Each applicable unit will require the planned UAV operation date, time, location, altitude, and contact information a minimum of 48 hours in advance. Preliminary assessments for safety will be coordinated at that time. Within 30 minutes of the planned UAV operation, the appropriate NAV CANADA coordination point further requires a final contact for operational approval and a confirmation contact once the UAV operation has concluded. For operations in Class E airspace with a Flight Service Stations (FSS): Flight Service Stations are the most common Air Traffic System facility. Part of their role is to inform aircraft of conditions, observed or relayed to them by pilots or other reliable sources, which may affect flight safety. This includes UAV operations. Their area of responsibility is usually within 5 NM of served aerodromes, from the surface up to 3000ft AGL. That said, the dimensions vary significantly throughout the region and the appropriate aviation publications (CFS, VNC, VTA) must be consulted to confirm dimensions. For UAV operations within Class E control zone, all operations will be coordnated in advance with the applicable ATC/ATS unit.
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  • Summer '14
  • mickey
  • certificate applicant, UAV Operations, Special Flight Operations, Flight Operations Certificate, Transport Canada Special

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