Traditionally a bill is written and presented to Congress From there the next

Traditionally a bill is written and presented to

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Traditionally, a bill is written and presented to Congress. From there, the next step is to decide which committee to send the bill to, using the help of the parliamentarian. Once the committee
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7 has been chosen, a hearing is held, or isn’t, essentially killing the bill in committee. If a hearing is held on the bill, that is when the committee will be able to hear expert opinions on the bill. Following a hearing is the markup stage where it may or may not be amended and then voted on. From there, it is sent to the House of Representatives and the Senate. The House Committee on Rules establishes the rules for the bill and then it is sent to the floor for debate and amendments. The House then votes on the bill. If the bill advances, it will be sent to the Senate. Once in the Senate, it is also debated, amended and then voted on. Once both chambers agree on an identical bill, it is forwarded to the President for approval. If the President approves the bill, it becomes a law. If the President vetoes the bill, it is sent back to Congress. The bill may pass with a two- thirds vote from both chambers. If the bill does not receive a two-thirds vote, it dies (Krutz, 2017, para.11). One major change in the legislative process is the modern filibuster. The filibuster tactic is when a senator speaks for a very long time, preventing the Senate from voting on a bill. In 1917, the Senate passed Rule 22, allowing the Senate to vote to end a debate. This is called a cloture. The modern filibuster is an alteration to the cloture rule with hopes to avoid filibusters altogether. Today, senators can request cloture before any bill, giving the senate minority the power to kill the bill in hopes of avoiding a filibuster later (Krutz, 2017, para.11). Conclusion In closing, the changes, or amendments, that have been made since the Constitution was signed were to benefit the ever-growing country of the United States. The powers of the President and of Congress might have expanded slightly, but each branch will always go through checks and balances ensuring that not one branch become to powerful. The U.S. Constitution was and still is a brilliant document.
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8 References Adapted from O'Connor, Karen, Larry J. Sabato, Stefan D. Haag, and Gary A. Keith. 2004.  American Government: Continuity and Change. Pearson Education Inc. p. 226.;  Edwards, David V. and Alessandra Lippucci. 1998. Practicing American Politics: An  Introduction to Government. Worth Publishers. p. 417.-----------Retrieved from  Cornell Law School Legal Information Institute(n.d.). Retrieved from  Krutz, G. (2017). American Government. Retrieved from The University of Phoenix eBook  Collection database. U. S. Const. art. II, § 1-3 U.S. Government Checks and Balances(n.d.). Retrieved from  g.html
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