They also were more likely to admit to sensation seeking and impulsive behavior

They also were more likely to admit to sensation

This preview shows page 40 - 43 out of 83 pages.

actual multitasking test. They also were more likely to admit to sensation-seeking and impulsive behavior , which correlates with how easily people get bored and distracted. The findings suggest that multitasking isn't boosting people's efficiency, Sanbonmatsu told LiveScience. "People multitask not because it's going to lead to greater productivity, but because they're distractible, and they get sucked into things that are not as important," he said. Adam Gazzaley, a neuroscientist at the University of California San Francisco, who was not involved in the study, said one limitation of the study was that it couldn't tease out whether people who start out less focused gravitate toward multitasking or whether people's cognitive abilities change as a result of multitasking.
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The findings do suggest, however, why the sensation-seekers who multitask the most may engage in risky distracted driving, said Paul Atchley, a researcher at the University of Kansas, who was not involved in the study. "People who are multitasking are generally less sensitive to risky situations," Atchley said. "This may partly explain why people are engaging in these situations even though they're dangerous."
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Bob Samuels presents a case against distance education, which he says is trying to replicate large lecture classes rather than the best of academe. by Bob Samuels published in Inside Higher Ed January 24, 2013 27 COMMENTS Being Present One potentially positive result of the current fascination with online education is that universities and colleges may be forced to define and defend quality education. This analysis of what we value should help us to present to the public the importance of higher education in a high-tech world. However, the worst thing to do is to equate university education with its worst forms of instruction, which will in turn open the door for distance learning. Perhaps the most destructive aspect of higher education is the use of large lecture classes. Not only does this type of learning environment tend to focus on students memorizing information for multiple-choice tests, but it also undermines any real distinction between in- person and online education. As one educational committee at the University of California at Los Angeles argued, we should just move most of our introductory courses online because they are already highly impersonal and ineffective. In opposition to this argument, we need to define and defend high-quality in-person classes. Although some would argue that we should prepare students for the new high-tech world of self-instruction , we still need to teach students how to focus, concentrate, and sustain attention. In large classes, where the teacher often does not even know if the students are in attendance, it is hard to get students to stay on task, and many times, these potential learners are simply surfing the web or text messaging. In a small class, it is much harder for students to be invisible and to multitask, and while some may say that it is not the role of university educators
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