O an event that is relatively discrete in time and

Info icon This preview shows pages 3–5. Sign up to view the full content.

o An event that is relatively discrete in time and causes abrupt change in ecosystem, community, or population structure and chances resources substrate availability, or the physical environment What 6 ways to describe disturbances did we discuss in class? o Area affected o Frequency o Interval o Predictability o Intensity o Severity How are “frequency” and “interval” different? o Frequency- how often does it occur o Interval- how long between the disturbance
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

What is stability when discussing a plant communities’ response to disturbance? o Means that a system tends to return to its original state after disturbance What is “Resilience”? “Resistance”? Can you give good examples of either? o Resilience= ability to return to pre-disturbance conditions o Resistance= ability to resist change Applying Plant Ecology: Restoration Ecology What is “restoration ecology” as defined by the Society for Ecology Restoration? o intentional activity that initiates or accelerates the recovery of an ecosystem with respect to its health, integrity and sustainability What are the differences between “Restoration”, “Rehabilitation”, “Revegetation”, “Reclamation”, “Replacement”, and “Mitigation”? Be able to describe what each is and how closely each one might mimic the “original” plant community. o Restoration o Rehabilitation- improvement, enhancement o Revegetation- revegetation and reclamation fall under broad definition of restoration o Reclamation- “” o Replacement- planting foreign plants in ecosystem when native plants aren’t available o Mitigation- mainly applies to wetlands- no net loss- cannot destroy wetlands in U.S. w/o a permit and without building a wetland somewhere else What are the four main historical “sources” for restoration ecology?
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Spring '14
  • Ecology, restoration ecology, Ecological succession, secondary succession

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern