Inserts You will often have information to insert into your logbook eg computer

Inserts you will often have information to insert

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Inserts - You will often have information to insert into your logbook (e.g., computer printouts). These should be taped into the book to continue the flow of your experimental work. Be sure to identify and label all such material so that it is clear what information has been included. Questions : Answer all numbered questions completely and clearly. You do not need to rewrite the questions, but be sure you include enough information in your answer so someone reading it (like your instructor) will know to what you are responding. One-word answers are never a good idea. Wrap-Up Discussion at End of Each Lab: Accuracy : Your report should include a brief discussion of how your results or techniques could have been improved. Do NOT simply say "Experimental error" and do not make excuses for sloppy work. Answer the question, "If I were to repeat this experiment, what could I do differently to improve my results?" Implications : At the end of your report, write a concluding statement about the "big idea" of your work. Do not just restate a final number, but summarize the general physics concepts that were used and the implications of these concepts. This is often the most important part of your lab report so be sure to put time
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11 and thought into writing a useful statement. Try to answer the question, "What did all of this mean?" Participation : Each lab student is expected to participate in all aspects of the lesson, to contribute to the group’s work, and to allow and encourage the active participation of the other group members. Effective group work is one of the skills most sought after by employers and health practitioners and this laboratory course should provide you with experience in working as a group member. You can expect to change your partners during the term.
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12 Humanized Physics Labs - Physics 142 Lab Manual MECHANICS Bouncin’ 23 ELECTRICITY & MAGNETISM Storing Charge 60 Batteries and Bulbs 61 Going Around a Loop 62 Bioelectronics 63 Sending a Signal 64 Currents and Magnets 65 Measuring the Electron Mass 66 GEOMETRICAL OPTICS Forming Images 70 The Amazing Eye 71 MODERN PHYSICS Wave Properties of light 79 Using a Spectrometer 80 Introduction to Radiation Safety 82 Creating Images with Radiation………………………………………….84 APPENDICES Creating Graphical Models A Examples of Functional Models B1 Creating Linear Functional Models B2 Creating Exponential Functional Models B3 Handling Numerical Values C Introduction to LoggerPro ¥ D Introduction to Excel ¥ E Guidelines for Using Electronic Balances F Magnet Safety G
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13 These activities were developed with the support of the University of Nebraska and the NSF - ILI - IP grant #DUE-97-50638 and the NSF CCLI EMD grant #DUE-00-88780 Contributions by: V.L. Plano Clark R.G. Fuller, T.C. Koch, T. Oe, J. Rynearson, D.W. Joseph, J.M. Reynolds, E.A. Pearlstein, Shawn Langan, and Estefania Larsen The graphic artist for these labs was Mary Elizabeth Hiller University of Nebraska-Lincoln This project was supported, in part, by the National Science Foundation Opinions expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Foundation
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