in cytosol of epithelial cell aminopeptidases and intracellular peptidases

In cytosol of epithelial cell aminopeptidases and

This preview shows page 64 - 66 out of 68 pages.

in cytosol of epithelial cell: aminopeptidases and intracellular peptidases   amino  acids Amino acids enter cell via symport with Na + Small peptides enter via symport with H + H + /Na +  antiporter keeps concentration gradients of H +  and Na + Amino acids exit cell via passive carriers for different amino acids   blood  energy derived from working of baso-lateral Na + /K +  pump end products of fat digestion are absorbed into lymphatic system via action of miscelles and  chylomicrons fat digestion and absorption Large fat globules (triglycerides) emulsified by detergent bile salts   smaller fat droplets;  prevents fat droplets from coalescing, increases surface area available for attack by  pancreatic lipase Lipase hydrolyzes triglycerides   monoglycerides and free fatty acids These water-insoluble products are carried to luminal surface of small-intestine epithelial  cells within water-soluble micelles (formed by bile) When micelle approaches absorptive epithelial surface, monoglycerides and fatty acids  passively diffuse through lipid bilayer of luminal membranes Reform into triglycerides   aggregate and coated with lipoprotein (comes from  endoplasmic reticulum, make water soluble)   chylomicrons
Image of page 64
Exocytosis into lymph vessels – central lacteal (cannot enter capillaries) Capillaries have an outer layer of polysaccharides that prevent chylomicrons from  entering – lymph vessels lack this barrier Iron absorption: Essential for hemoglobin production Normal intake: 15-20 mg/day Absorb – males:  .5-1.0 mg/day; females: 1.0-1.5  mg/day (lose iron in menustration) Dietary iron exists in 2 forms Heme iron (meats): absorbed more efficiently Inorganic iron (plants): exists primarily as Fe 3+  (ferric);  reduced to Fe 2+  (ferris) by membrane bound enzyme prior to absorption vitamin C increases iron absorption by reducing Fe 3+    Fe  2+ heme iron enters intestinal cell via heme carrier protein 1 Fe 2+  enters via divalent metal transporter 1 Iron exits small intestinal cell via membrane iron transporter, ferroportin Iron absorption controlled by hepcidin – hormone released from liver when iron levels  become elevated; prevents further iron export from SI epithelial cells into blood by binding  with ferroprotein, promoting internalization and subsequent degradation by lysosomes Iron transported by transferrin in blood Iron not immediately needed stored in intestinal cells in granular form – ferritin Calcium absorption Enters SI epithelial cells via specialized Ca 2+  channel (~1 g  taken in daily) Ca 2+  ferried within cell by calbindin Ca 2+  exits basolateral membrane by 2 energy dependent processes Ca 2+  active transport pump Na + -Ca 2+  antiporter Vitamin-D (activated in liver and kidney) enhances Ca 2+ absorption
Image of page 65
Image of page 66

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture