students formative and summative assessments report card data and special needs

Students formative and summative assessments report

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students formative and summative assessments, report card data, and special needs and services (English language learner, special education, speech and language, and so on). In addition, every meeting has a documented form and objective. Each grade level has a facilitator, and for each subject a goal for the year is set (for example, 80% of our students will be proficient or above in math this school year). After the goal is set, pieces of evidence are identified that will be examined to determine whether the goals have been attained. A third grade teacher stated, “We use MAP testing, running records, and other common assessments put on our data wall in order to see progress students are making.” From there, students may be identified as “on watch” based upon their performance on given assessments. Students on “watch”are discussed at each grade level, and the question of how student needs are addressed in the universal curriculum is discussed. Students who need extra help outside of the universal instruction are identified. These students are given a selected option or an intervention in addition to the universal instruction they receive. The interventions for literacy consist of small group instruction with a literacy specialist or reading intervention teacher; for math, an intervention program was purchased by the district. It is important to note that Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) have been around for nearly a decade, so the PLC itself is not what has led to an increase in student achievement. However, the principals coming up with a process for establishing meeting times and organizing the common language necessary to have effective professional learning communities is the relevant practice. Using the PLC model to track student progress, developing and using common forms so everyone is on the same page, and being able to manage and update an assessment wall are important practices that Gene implemented. Gene made PLCs at Gibson Elementary School work effectively. Data-driven instruction and comprehensive intervention A first-grade teacher, when asked what the principal has done to raise student achievement at Gibson, stated, Scheduling time for student interventions, having a system to identify which students need those interventions the most, and getting them into those interventions was key for Gene’s success in raising student achievement.” Once this process of monitoring and identifying students was in place, the question remained as to what was needed to move forward. “This was the key to it all,” Gene stated. “Being able to identify who needs extra help means nothing if you aren’t able to give it systemically.” Of the six teachers interviewed in this building, five mentioned that this was one of the top five actions Gene implemented that led to the increase of student achievement. It’s one thing to know its important in theory, but being able to have a schedule that
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