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Burns are classified through the severity of the burn

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. Burns are classified through theseverity of the burn.First degree burns, also called superficial burns, only damage the
epidermis layer of the skin(Figure 7.15). The burned area becomes dry, red, and painful, withoutblistering. One example of a first-degree burn is a mild sunburn that does not blister.Figure 7.15First degree burn following a cooking accident.Second-degree burns, also called partial thickness burns, damage the epidermis and part of thedermis layers of the skin. The burn turns red and forms blisters, becoming painful and swollen(Figure 7.16). The dermis has many sensory organs embedded within it, so damage to the dermislayer is painful.
Figure 7.16Second degree burn of the shoulder. Note the blisters formed on the skin.Third-degree burns, also called full thickness burns, damage the epidermis, the entire dermisand may extend slightly into the subcutaneous layer of the skin. The injured skin typically lookswhite and may even have a “charred” appearance(Figure 7.17). The extensive damage to thedermis layer of the skin makes third degree burns extremely painful.
Figure 7.17Third degree burn following a car accident. Note the white/charred appearance.Fourth-degree burnsdamage the epidermis, the dermis, the hypodermis, and underlying tissuesuch as muscle or bone. Because the nerve endings are destroyed there is no sensation in theaffected burn area.Burns heal in the same manner as other skin injuries. However, a skin graft may be necessary ifthe skin has been too severely damaged or if the burn covers a large surface area.Skin graftingis a treatment where healthy skin is taken from a person’s own body and grafted on top of thedamaged area. Skin grafting decreases recovery time and prevents infection.Introduction to the Integumentary System1. The integumentary system is comprised of what three parts of the body?
2. List the three layers of the skin from superficial to deep.
3. Describe three functions of the integumentary system.
Sense Organs4. True or false: Thermoreceptors detect fine touch.
5. Merkel’s cells and Meisner’s corpuscles are thermoreceptors
6. True or false: Pacinian corpuscles detect pressure.
7. Review shape and location of sensory organs in the layers of the skin (Figure 7.3)
8. Describe what an exocrine gland contains and how its contents reach the surface of the skin.
9. What is a sebaceous gland?
10. What is the purpose of thermoregulation in the body?
The Epidermis

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Stratum Corneum

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