Lastly counselors can develop their cultural self

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Lastly, counselors can develop their cultural self-awareness and competence by reading diverseliterature.Through reading works by culturally diverse authors, school counselors engage incritical thinking, broaden their worldviews, and reflect on past and present realities of thesecultural groups (Erford, 2019).3. Student shares reflections on the significance of multicultural sensitivity to his or her work asa professional school counselor.Multicultural sensitivity is significant for school counselors because all schoolenvironments are welcome to diverse student populations.School counselors will haveinteractions with and offer assistance to students from their own culture as well as many different
COLLABORATIVE MODEL18cultures.School counselors must become familiar with the cultures, beliefs, and value systemsof the students that attend the school.Sensitivity is key when counseling students from differingbackgrounds, and school counselors should complete the School Counselor MulticulturalCompetence Checklist.This checklist includes 11 dimensions of multicultural competence andwill allow the school counselor to determine the areas where improvement is needed (Erford,2019).School counselors can most effectively and appropriately serve students when they haveknowledge and awareness of diverse cultures and can demonstrate sensitivity when required.
COLLABORATIVE MODEL19ReferencesAmerican Association of Christian Counselors. (2014). AACC code of ethics. Retrieved from-Document.pdfAmerican Counseling Association. (2014). Code of ethics. Retrieved fromAmerican School Counselor Association. (2012).The ASCA National Model: Aframework for school counseling programs(3rded.). Alexandria, VA: AuthorAmerican School Counselor Association. (2016). ASCA ethical standards for school counselors.Retrieved fromBryan, J. & Holcomb-McCoy, C. (2007). An examination of school counselor involvement inschool-family-community partnerships.Professional School Counseling, 10(5), 441-454.Retrieved from =as&v=2.1&u=vic_liberty&it=DIourl&s=RELEVANCE&p=AONE&qt=SN%7E1096-2409%7E%7ETI%7E%22An+Examination+of+School%22%7E%7EVO%7E10%7E%7ESP%7E2156759%7E%7EIU%7E5&lm=DA%7E120070000&sw=wCox, J. (n.d.). Teaching strategies that advocate your students. Retrieved fromErford, B. T. (2019).Transforming the school counseling profession(5thed.). New York, NY:Pearson Education, Inc.House, R. M. & Sears, S. J. (2002). Preparing school counselors to be leaders and advocates: Acritical need in the new millennium.Theory into Practice, 41(3), 154-162. Retrieved
COLLABORATIVE MODEL20from -origsite=summonNational Education Association. (2019). Strategies for closing the achievement gaps. Retrievedfrom Poth, R. D. (2018). Promoting family engagement: 5 ways to foster meaningful connection.Retrieved from -ways-to-foster-a-more-meaningful-connection/ReadingRockets.org. (2018). How parents can be advocates for their children. Retrieved fromSchellenberg, R. (2013).A new era in school counseling: A practical guide(2nded.). New York,NY: Rowman & Littlefield EducationStone, C. (2017).School counseling principles: Ethics and Law(4thed.). Alexandria, VA:American School Counselor AssociationWhite, S. W. & Kelly, F. D. (2010). The school counselor’s role in school dropout prevention.Journal of Counseling and Development, 88(2), 227-235. Retrieved fromA221849320&v=2.1&it=r&sid=summon
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Term
Summer
Professor
Rita Schellenberg
Tags
The Land, School counselor, Education and training occupations

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