Sedationparalysis reduces the bodys demand for oxygen

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Sedation/Paralysis – reduces the body’s demand for oxygen but can weaken the diaphragm and prolong recovery Antibiotics – to treat common underlying etiology of infection Other – relieve pain, prevent blood clots, minimize gastric reflux Treatment Interventions Mechanical Ventilation – pressure cycled PEEP (Positive End Expiratory Pressure), inspiration phase ends when preset pressure is reached in the airway to keep alveoli open and compensate for the reduced pulmonary compliance Conservative Fluid Management – high fluid levels will exacerbate edema; Nutrition – increase proteins and k/cals to provide for growth and repair of cells; decrease CHO since byproduct is CO2 which would add strain to breathing since levels are already high
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Problem Focused Diagnosis Impaired gas exchange related to impaired oxygen supply and damage to alveoli as evidenced by hyperventilation, anxiety, and altered mental state Risk Diagnosis Risk for injury related to infectious microorganisms Wellness Diagnosis Readiness for enhanced hope as evidenced by patient’s expression of hope for a positive outcome and full recovery Nursing Diagnosis
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ARDS can occur at any age but more common among older adults Ages 15-19: 16 cases per 100,000 Ages 75-84: 306 cases per 100,000 Who Is Affected Special Considerations Older adults are often hypothermic Patients with ARDS can be critically ill and unable to provide a history. A history should be sought from family or significant other Economic Impact ARDS is the result of an inflammatory response not a chronic disease. As such, there is no measurable economic impact
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1) ARDS is a ______ syndrome? a) cardiac b) pulmonary c) gastric d) renal 2) The first stage of ARDS is _____ ? a) exudative phase c) proliferative phase b) fibroproliferative phase d) distress phase 3) Diagnostic testing shows that Jon has bilateral pulmonary infiltrate, left ventricular dysfunction and elevated BNP levels. The most likely diagnosis is ____?
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  • Spring '16
  • DR.CARROLL
  • Case Study, Gcu, Ppt Presentation, Acute respiratory distress syndrome, ARDS, bilateral pulmonary infiltrates, NU275

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