Role-of-advocacy-against-child-labour.pdf

The situation of child labour after the intervention

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The Situation of Child Labour after the Intervention and Identification of Good Practices ........... 24 8 Lessons Learnt and Pre-conditions to Effective Advocacy ............................................................ 25 8.1 Availability of resources is a Pre-condition ............................................................................. 25 8.2 Capacity and Motivation .......................................................................................................... 26 8.3 Effective Sharing and Use of Information Provided ................................................................ 29 8.4 Advocacy Needs Fast-Laners to be Effective .......................................................................... 30 9 Conclusion ...................................................................................................................................... 31 References ............................................................................................................................................. 33
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CMI REPORT THE ROLE OF ADVOCACY AGAINST CHILD LABOUR 2015: 2 1 1 Introduction Although Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) use advocacy as a strategy to influence policies, laws and programmes that states should be providing to their citizens, especially those related to the rights of children, not much has been done in terms of research to measure the effectiveness of these endeavours. Thus, it becomes difficult to associate the advocacy activities, in which, CSOs are involved with influencing decisions or actions that states or governments undertake to address issues affecting the rights of children. Often, some of the lobbying activities by CSOs to initiate the enactment of laws or formulation of policies for decades merely result in ineffective implementation and myriads of draft policies. In Kenya, a number of CSOs lobbied for the enactment of Sexual Offences and the Anti-Trafficking Bills with little success. It took a nominated member of Parliament to complete the process expeditiously. But, even after the enactment of this legislation, the implementation process is wanting. For example, cases of sexual abuse take too long in court processes, making many parents of the victims give up and fail to pursue the cases. A significant number of policies on different issues of children are still in drafts. The Counter-Trafficking Act is still to be implemented effectively since its enactment in 2010, while a draft policy on child labour, whose formulation stated in 1996, remains a draft in 2014. In the Kenyan context, CSOs are described as a range of organizations not for profit, ranging from Community-Based to Non-Governmental Organizations. In another terminology they are lumped together as non-state actors. The Faith-Based Organizations (FBOs) are also considered part of this category. Whatever the label attached to these groups, their common feature, is their complimentary role vis-à-vis the state. A large number of these organizations address issues related to child rights. Many came into existence after Kenya ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) in 1990/91. Most of them tend to identify areas of action the government is failing to address and use advocacy to win the attention of the government or the relevant authority. A significant number of these organizations have played major roles in the process of formulating policies and enacting laws affecting children in Kenya. Moreover, they have been in the forefront to ensure implementation and enforcement of the policies and legislations affecting children in the country.
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  • Spring '17
  • Districts of Kenya, Nairobi, Child labour, Ministry of Labour

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