Narrator is asking the irish to revert to cannibalism

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narrator is asking the Irish to revert to cannibalism, which not just eating other human beings, it includes their own children. When the narrator begins to introduce this preposterous proposal, he comments, "I shall now therefore humbly propose my own thoughts, which I hope will not be liable to the least objection." (11) He proposes the idea of eating the young and then downplays this ridiculous notion as being humble. Although the narrator is suggesting an appalling idea, he minimizes it as a humble thought by claiming it is something simple or unpretentious and then continues to report that there will be no objections to his way of thinking. The narrator uses the term "carcass" more than once to describe the children being discussed. The Canadian Oxford Paperback Dictionary defines a carcass as "the dead body of an animal, especially one slaughtered for its meat"(138). By using the word carcass, the narrator exhibits that the Irish peasants are thought of as subhuman. Despite suggesting an outlandish notion, he is trying to make others see that there is a problem and it needs to be solved. Metaphors are used continuously throughout this essay to parallel the Irish peasants to animals. Before introducing the proposal, the narrator compares Americans to savages when he states, "a very knowing American"(11) told him that a child of one year makes "wholesome food"(11). They are treated like animals by the English and their landlords. The narrator also discusses eating the Irish infants, like one would a piece of animal flesh. The Irish peasants are constantly portrayed as animals. For example, "Pigs...are no way comparable in taste or magnificence to a well-grown, fat yearling child," (14) compares the babies directly to pigs. While introducing his proposal to the reader, he talks of how "infants' flesh will be in season throughout the year"(11).
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