Unacknowledged feelings create unnecessary emotional

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Unacknowledged feelings create unnecessary emotional debris that clutters present-centeredawareness. Because the feelings are not fully experienced in awareness, they linger in the backgroundand are carried into present life in ways that interfere with effective contact with oneself and others.Unfinished business persists until the individual faces and deals with the unexpressed feelings. Theeffects of unfinished business often show up in some blockage within the body, and the counselor’stask is to assist clients in exploring these bodily expressions.Gestalt counselors emphasize paying attention to the bodily experience on the assumption that iffeelings are unexpressed they tend to result in some physical sensations or problems.
GESTALT THEORYGestalt Theory:Counseling GoalsGestalt counseling does not ascribe to a “goal-oriented” methodology per se, but counselors clearlyattend to a basic goal -- namely, assisting the client to attain greater awareness, and with it, greaterchoice.Through a creative involvement in Gestalt process, Zinker (1978) expects clients will do thefollowing:Move toward increased awareness of themselvesGradually assume ownership of their experience (as opposed to making others responsible forwhat they are thinking, feeling, and doing)Develop skills and acquire values that will allow them to satisfy their needs without violating therights of othersBecome more aware of all of their senses.Learn to accept responsibility for what they do, including accepting the consequences of theiractionsBe able to ask for and get help from others and be able to give to others.
GESTALT THEORYGestalt Theory:Counselors Function and RoleThe counselor’s job is to invite clients into an active partnership where they can learn aboutthemselves by adopting an experimental attitude toward life in which they try out new behaviorsand notice what happens (Perls, Hefferline, & Goodman, 1951).Gestalt counselors use active methods and personal engagement with clients to increase theirawareness, freedom, and self-direction rather than directing them toward preset goals.An important function of Gestalt counselors is paying attention to clients’ body language. Thesenonverbal cues provide rich information as they often represent feelings of which the client isunaware.
GESTALT THEORYGestalt Theory:Counselor-Client RelationshipGestalt practice involves a person-to-person relationship between counselor and client.Counselors are responsible for the quality of their presence, for knowing themselves and theclient, and for remaining open to the client. They are also responsible for establishing andmaintaining a therapeutic atmosphere that will foster a spirit of work on the client’s part.It is important that counselors allow themselves to be affected by their clients and that theyactively share their own present perceptions and experiences as they encounter clients in the hereand now.Counselors are expected to encounter clients with honest and immediate reactions, and counselorsshare their personal experience and stories in relevant and appropriate ways. Further, they givefeedback that allows clients to develop an awareness of what they are actually doing.
GESTALT THEORYGestalt Theory:Counseling Techniques and Procedures

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Term
Spring
Professor
Dr. Janice Speck
Tags
Fritz Perls, Gestalt therapy

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