TINA_Advanced_Topics.pdf

If you press the list button and then press the

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If you press the List button and then press the unlabeled button to the right, the List Editor for parameter stepping will appear: By default it will show three values calculated between the Start and End value, but you can enter any values you wish, remove values, or clear the list entirely. Press OK to return to the previous dialog window which, in turn can be closed by its OK button. You can also turn off parameter stepping for this component using the Remove button. You can repeat the above procedure for any number of parameters to be stepped. Note that you do not have to use the same number of cases for each value being stepped. TINA will run an analysis for all possible combinations of values stepped. For example, if you ask to vary part A in three steps and part B in four steps, you’ll get twelve curves. The program will go into parameter stepping mode automatically whenever a component is set as control object according to the procedure above. The mode status can be checked via the Analysis/Mode dialog window. You can use this dialog window to select single analysis or parameter stepping analysis.
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Using this dialog window, you can also select Temperature Stepping, Worst Case and Monte Carlo analysis. An example will make Parameter Stepping clearer. Load the file RLC_1.TSC from TINA’s EXAMPLES folder. Note that this circuit is already in parameter stepping mode for the resistor R, which is changed between 100 and 1.1k in 3 steps. Click the button, select the R resistor with the new cursor, and press Select. You should see the following dialog window: After closing this dialog and running Analysis/AC Analysis/AC Transfer Characteristic, the following diagram will appear:
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To determine which value of the stepped parameter is associated with a curve, move the cursor over the curve and read the corresponding value in the line at the bottom of the screen. You can also use the Legend and Auto value buttons in the diagram window to show the corresponding stepped values. Refer to the diagram below. Now let’s step the value of the capacitor using the List option. Let the values be 100pF and 1nF. Click the button, select the capacitor C, and press Select. You should see the following window: Select the List option and press the button to its right. The following dialog will appear:
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Press the Remove Last button and set the first parameter to 100p. Now close all the dialog windows by pressing their OK buttons and run Analysis/AC Analysis/AC Transfer Characteristic. The new set of curves belonging to the cases where C=100pF can be clearly recognized on the right side of the diagram. We have also added two auto labels showing the typical values of the parameters.
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DC Transfer Characteristic and parameter sweeping To calculate a DC transfer characteristic, you should assign exactly one input (normally a voltage or current source or generator, or a resistor) and at least one output. Later, you can change the assigned input in the DC Transfer Characteristic dialog window. You can also add more outputs using the post-processor. Plotting a result as a function
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