Federalist hated it mostly north east Bankers refused to pay for war The Treaty

Federalist hated it mostly north east bankers refused

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Federalist hated it (mostly north east) Bankers refused to pay for war The Treaty of Ghent By the end of 1814, both sides had had enough and wanted peace
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They met in Ghent, Belgium and concluded a treaty of peace It ended hostilities All captured land would be returned to the prewar owner No mention was made of impressment but it was generally believed that the practice would stop The treaty was signed and announced (locally) on December 24, 1814 If U.S. agreed to drop charged for impressment Britain will leave canada border open and offer space for indians Ratified by parliament and senate - in Feb Jackson’s victory in New Orleans was 2 weeks after the treaty so it didn’t mean anything Officially no winner of the War of 1812 Results of the War A new sense of nationalism Twice we beat the British American actually got the respect they want Britain stops impressment on American sailors Era of Good feelings - persion of intense nationalism American industry began to grow because of the blockade of shipping by the British Respect from other nations – especially in Europe Expansion westward was more feasible since the Indian threat had been removed (they were no longer being armed by the British and many had been killed or dispersed with Tecumseh) The most conspicuous casualty of the war was the Federalist party War heroes emerged— Andrew Jackson and William Henry Harrison—both to later become president Federalist party disappeared Post War Economic Development A Market Economy is Born Market Economy Helped by three main things Transportation Industrial The Transportation Revolution Three Stages: Canals - man made waterways where horses could tow flat bottomed barges Steamboats - ships that relied on the steam engine for power and could
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be used on rivers, canals or even on ocean-going ships Railroads - first using horse power then shifting toward steam powered propulsion By 1830 Took shorter time Roads and Turnpikes Roads: Most were privately built and funded (often as toll roads) The National Road (aka the Cumberland Road) connecting Maryland to Illinois via Ohio and Indiana was funded with some federal money First to received national funding Started in 1806 Cumberland, Maryland to Virginia Democratic Republicans would have said no but instead they said ok Turnpike is a toll road Roads in 1825 The National Road (connecting Cumberland, MD to Wheeling, VA) was finished by 1818 Most were private toll roads due to differences between Federalists and Democratic Republicans Relenting on beginning of War of 1812 but needed them for communication Federalist doesn’t make canals cuz it would only favor a few people Jefferson rejected a lot of things for federal funding but places got state funding Erie canal is made by NY with state funding 1821 - 14,000 miles of turnpike Steam Power The age of steampowered travel began in 1807 with the successful voyage up the Hudson River of the Clermont, built by Robert Fulton.
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