DSST Anthropology as a Discipline 2

Question 13 of 60 other modern techniques that have

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Question 13 of 60 Other modern techniques that have been applied to archaeological prospecting employ electricity and magnetic fields (geophysical prospecting). Your Answer: Explanation A method of electrical prospecting had been developed in large-scale oil prospecting: this technique, based on the degree of electrical conductivity present in the soil, began to be used by archaeologists in the late 1940s and has since proved very useful. Question 14 of 60 Magnetic methods of prospecting detect buried features by locating the magnetic disturbances they cause: these were introduced in 1957–58 and use such machines as the proton magnetometer, the
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proton gradiometer, and the fluxgate gradiometer. Your Answer: Explanation An American expedition discovered the site of Sybaris in Sicily by magnetic prospecting. Electromagnetic methods have been in use only since 1962; they employ developments of the concepts used in mine detectors. Instruments such as the pulsed-induction meter and the soil-conductivity meter detect magnetic soil anomalies, but only if the features are fairly shallow. Question 15 of 60 Excavation is the surgical aspect of archaeology: it is surgery of the buried landscape and is carried out with all the skilled craftsmanship that has been built up in the last hundred years since Schliemann and Flinders Petrie. Your Answer: Explanation Excavations can be classified, from the point of view of their purpose, as planned, rescue, or accidental. Question 16 of 60 The first cache of the Dead Sea Scrolls was discovered in 1947 by a Bedouin looking for a stray animal. Your Answer: Explanation These accidental finds often lead to important excavations. Question 17 of 60 Some sites are explored provisionally by sampling cuts known as sondages . Your Answer: Explanation Large sites are not usually dug out entirely, although a moderate-sized round barrow may be completely moved by excavation. Question 18 of 60 The Palaeolithic Period, also called the Old Stone Age, is an ancient cultural stage, or level, of human development, characterized by the use of rudimentary chipped stone tools. Your Answer: Explanation At sites dating from the Lower Paleolithic Period (about 2,500,000 to 200,000 years ago), simple pebble tools have been found in association with the remains of what may have been the earliest human ancestors.
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Question 19 of 60 A somewhat more sophisticated Lower Paleolithic tradition, known as the chopper -chopping tool industry, is widely distributed in the Eastern Hemisphere. Your Answer: Explanation The chopper-chopping tool industry is the earliest recognized tool tradition used by hominids; also known as the "pebble industry". This tradition is thought to have been the work of the hominid species named Homo erectus. Although no such fossil tools have yet been found, it is believed that H. erectus probably made tools of wood and bone as well as stone.
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