He eventually destroyed the Bank in the 1830s by withholding all federal gold

He eventually destroyed the bank in the 1830s by

This preview shows page 10 - 11 out of 44 pages.

charter. He eventually destroyed the Bank in the 1830s by withholding all federal gold and silver deposits and  putting them in smaller banks instead. Without any reserves, the Bank withered until its charter expired in 1836. Deprived of stable credit, the blossoming financial sector of the economy crashed in the  Panic of 1837  . Bank War A conflict between  Andrew Jackson  and  Henry Clay  over 1832 legislation that was intended to renew the  charter of the  Bank of the United States . Clay pushed the bill through Congress, hoping it would slim  Jackson’s reelection chances: signing the charter would cost Jackson support among southern and western  voters who opposed the bank, whereas vetoing the charter would alienate wealthier eastern voters. Jackson  vetoed the bill, betting correctly that his supporters in the South and West outnumbered the rich in the East.  Upon reelection, Jackson withheld all federal deposits from the Bank, rendering it essentially useless until its  charter expired in 1836. Black Hawk War A brief 1832 war in Illinois in which the U.S. Army trounced  Chief Black Hawk  and about 1,000 of his Sauk and Fox followers, who refused to be resettled according to the Indian Removal Act. Burned-Over District An area of western New York State that earned its nickname as a result of its especially high concentration of  hellfire-and-damnation  revivalist  preaching in the 1830s. The Burned-Over District was the birthplace of many  new faiths, sects, and denominations, including the  Mormon church  and the  Oneida community . Religious  zeal also made the area a hotbed for  reform movements  during the 1840s.  Cohens v. Virginia   An 1821 Supreme Court ruling that set an important precedent reaffirming the Court’s authority to  review  all  decisions made by state courts. When the supreme court of Virginia found the Cohen brothers guilty of illegally  selling lottery tickets, the brothers appealed their case to the U.S. Supreme Court. Chief Justice John Marshall  heard the case and ruled against the family. Though he concurred with the state court’s decision, he  nonetheless cemented the Supreme Court’s authority over the state courts. This case was one of many during  the early 1800s in which Marshall expanded the Court’s and the federal government’s power. Compromise Tariff of 1833 A tariff, proposed by  Henry Clay , that ended the  Nullification Crisis  dispute between Andrew Jackson and  South Carolina. The compromise tariff repealed the Tariff of Abominations and reduced duties on foreign goods gradually over a decade to the levels set by the Tariff of 1816.
Image of page 10
Image of page 11

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 44 pages?

  • Fall '15
  • Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, President Andrew Jackson

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes