Many and many to many logistics systems inventory

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many, and many-to-many logistics systems; inventory management; vehicle routing; terminals, transshipments and terminal systems; facility locations; relevant analytical methodologies. The online section of this course is restricted to online non-degree, online MCS, online MSME and online MS CE students. Online & Continuing Education (OCE) restrictions and assessments apply, see . Prerequisites: CEE310 or IE 310 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Solid mathematical background, basic understanding of optimization concepts, and working knowledge of at least one computer programming language will be helpful. Textbook “Logistics Systems Analysis.” (4 th Edition) Daganzo, C.F., Springer-Verlag (2005) ( optional ) “Network and Discrete Location.” Daskin, M.S., Wiley-Interscience (1995)
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University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign CEE512 Logistics Systems Analysis 2 ( optional ) “The Vehicle Routing Problem.” Toth, P. and Vigo, D., Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (2002) Additional References “Urban Operations Research.” Larson, R.C., and Odoni, A.R., Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J. (1981). "The Logic of Logistics." Bramel, J., and Simchi-Levi, D., Springer (1997). "Urban Transportation Networks." Sheffi, Y., Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J. (1985). Grading Homework 35% Quizzes 30% Project 30% Classroom Participation 5% Homework Students will be graded on completion of homework problems (as listed in the course schedule). Some of them will be from the textbook, and others will be handed out in class. Each set of homework problem is worth either 10 or 20 points (based on difficulty), and all homework problem points sum up to 130. Students getting 90 points or more will receive full homework credits. We permit and encourage intellectual collaboration on assignments. However, each student should write their own answers in their own words. Identical approaches to a problem could be expected, but word-for-word identical responses are not acceptable.
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