God then consults middle knowledge to know how much

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God then consults middle knowledge to know how much grace is necessary to convince that person to render “sufficient grace” into “efficacious grace” by a free act of that person’s will. Finally, God gives that person that amount of grace to secure that free will decision. Molina himself (and the "semi-pelagians" believed that God does not first recognize how much grace a person will need to be convinced. God simply puts a person into a situation with “sufficient” grace knowing how that person will choose but not measuring the grace out to that person accordingly. In this way, the person’s choice is not based on God’s manipulation of circumstances. Election by foresight 3. How does predestination work? The "Semi-Augustinians" say God first elects’ certain persons to eternal salvation and then consults His middle knowledge to foresee how much grace that person needs to persevere. God then gives that person the situations and grace He knows the person needs to persevere. Molina and the "Semi-Pelagians" say that God first chose to CREATE a certain world. He then infallibly foresaw each person’s use of the grace He supplied to each person in that world. Finally, God elects persons to salvation based on His foresight of their free will perseverance. Note: Some current Protestants seem to hover between Semi-Augustinians and Semi-Pelagians. Their explanation seems to be this:
70 1. God consulted His MIDDLE KNOWLEDGE to factor into his plans how each person would use free will both in this world and in other possible worlds God could have created. 2. God then chose to bring this world’s set of human free will decisions into existence. 3. These Protestants hope this view demonstrates both how human decisions are “free” and how God is still sovereign . But does this explanation really demonstrate that humans have the power of contrary choice (ability to say yes or no) in this world? Questions : 1. Does God know and consider whether Billy would believe if Billy were to hear the Gospel under certain hypothetical circumstances? If you say, No – You deny God has or uses Middle Knowledge. Yes – You believe God has and uses Middle Knowledge. 2. Can God give Billy circumstances which God knows will convince Billy? If you say, No – You limit God’s omniscience and/or omnipotence, (If you say Billy may be too hard to be convinced, you limit Billy’s free will.) Yes – You accept God’s omniscience and omnipotence, (and you recognize that Billy would change his mind under different circumstances in which God planned for Billy to be a believer.) 3. If God uses His middle knowledge to plan, then God’s knowledge of Billy’s future decision happens in time before Billy actually decides. God’s prior knowledge of Billy’s future action seems to make Billy’s decision inevitable. If Billy’s decision is inevitable, how can we say Billy has the ability to say yes or no (power of “contrary choice ”) in this world)?
71 The Foreknowledge Debate (OPENNESS OF GOD) Open Theology Defined – God does not know the future decisions of free moral agents.

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