The brain adds the information to what it already knows In Piagets words the

The brain adds the information to what it already

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entirely on the senses of vision, hearing, touch, smell, and taste. The brain adds the information to what it already knows. In Piaget’s words, the brain continually assimilates, or digests, information.” Piaget’s theories line up and agree with this research. Children from birth to age two, are focusing on exploring the world with their senses and gaining an understanding through social interactions. A good consideration to this research, would be to conduct an experiment to primarily research it yourself. You could do this by, having a focus group and test them on their senses. Now, according to the text book Child & Adolescent Development in Your Classroom by Bergin & Bergin, an infant’s very first cognitions are sensory and motor oriented. This is extremely important to the development of a child. Bergin & Bergin write, “when infants are born, they immediately began to observe the world’s attempt to make sense of it. Through rooting, sucking, grasping, and looking, they lay a foundation for cognitive growth. At this stage, thought and action are indistinguishable.” (99) Baby Boy A shows strong growth as he has gained all the characteristics we’ve researched in the sensorimotor stage of cognitive development by Jean Piaget. Recommendations of continuing work with children to make sure they are progressing through the first stage of development, would be to always involve activities that are hands on. 4
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Future teachers or day-care workers can do this by singing songs, playing with blocks, giving new born babies colorful and stimulation toys, and more. Children are at their most imprint-able in the sensorimotor stage. 5
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III. References Bergin, C. C., & Bergin, D. A. (2012). Child and Adolescent Development in Your Classroom. Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning. DeVries, R. (1997). Piaget's Social Theory. Educational Researcher, 26 (2), 4-17. Retrieved from The Importance of Sensory Experience for Learning: Jean Piaget’s Theory of Intellectual Development. Keys to Great Parenting . doi: KENTUCKY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE. 6
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